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Scots Kirk of Colonial Kingston, Jamaica

Scots Kirk of Colonial Kingston, Jamaica The Scots Kirk of Colonial Kingston, Jamaica STEPHEN MULLEN In June 1822, James Steele, a Minister in Jamaica, wrote to Duncan Macfarlan, a Minister in Drymen near Stirling, who later became principal of Old College. Steele was a student at Old College, now the University of Glasgow, in the early 1800s and perhaps met Macfarlan who was Dean of Faculties at the same time. In this letter, Steele referred to his recent appointment as minister of the presbyterian Scots Kirk in Kingston, the first establishment of its type in the West Indies. He also reminded MacFarlan to recommend him to William Montagu, the Governor of Jamaica, in order to further his own position on the island and also to promote the interests of the Kirk. Steele requested closer connections with the colonial government which, he hoped, would bring ecclesiastical relief for the Scottish presbyterians of Kingston. This correspondence reveals social, political and religious networks between Scotland and Jamaica in the colonial period. The principal connection between the two nations, however, was transatlantic commerce based upon the trade in slave-grown produce. The links between Glasgow and Kingston were both commercial and ecclesiastical, although the latter have received much less scholarly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

Scots Kirk of Colonial Kingston, Jamaica

Scottish Church History , Volume 45 (1): 18 – Jun 1, 2016

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2016.0008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Scots Kirk of Colonial Kingston, Jamaica STEPHEN MULLEN In June 1822, James Steele, a Minister in Jamaica, wrote to Duncan Macfarlan, a Minister in Drymen near Stirling, who later became principal of Old College. Steele was a student at Old College, now the University of Glasgow, in the early 1800s and perhaps met Macfarlan who was Dean of Faculties at the same time. In this letter, Steele referred to his recent appointment as minister of the presbyterian Scots Kirk in Kingston, the first establishment of its type in the West Indies. He also reminded MacFarlan to recommend him to William Montagu, the Governor of Jamaica, in order to further his own position on the island and also to promote the interests of the Kirk. Steele requested closer connections with the colonial government which, he hoped, would bring ecclesiastical relief for the Scottish presbyterians of Kingston. This correspondence reveals social, political and religious networks between Scotland and Jamaica in the colonial period. The principal connection between the two nations, however, was transatlantic commerce based upon the trade in slave-grown produce. The links between Glasgow and Kingston were both commercial and ecclesiastical, although the latter have received much less scholarly

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2016

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