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Scotland's Bow-fronted Shops

Scotland's Bow-fronted Shops Lindsay Lennie The bow-fronted shop is embedded in our idea of what a traditional shop should look like; it is the ubiquitous image on chocolate boxes and Christmas cards. This nostalgic view is so integral to our mindset of a traditional shop that pseudo-Georgian bow-fronts complete with mock ‘bull’s eye’ glass prevail in town centres, more common than the shops they seek to imitate. This article looks at the rise of the bow-fronted shop in Scotland as prosperity increased at the end of the eighteenth century, and its short-lived popularity. This is in the context of both historical research and an examination of a small number of shop windows that survive. It considers how variations in style and design offer an insight into the influences on early shop windows and considers whether architectural fashion was more of a defining factor than the practical side of retailing. R e t a i l i n g i n E i g h t e e n t h - C e n t u ry S c o t l a n d Henry Grey Graham in his observations on eighteenth-century Scotland describes the desperate state of the country http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Scotland's Bow-fronted Shops

Architectural Heritage , Volume 20 (1): 75 – Nov 1, 2009

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2009
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/E135075240900020X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lindsay Lennie The bow-fronted shop is embedded in our idea of what a traditional shop should look like; it is the ubiquitous image on chocolate boxes and Christmas cards. This nostalgic view is so integral to our mindset of a traditional shop that pseudo-Georgian bow-fronts complete with mock ‘bull’s eye’ glass prevail in town centres, more common than the shops they seek to imitate. This article looks at the rise of the bow-fronted shop in Scotland as prosperity increased at the end of the eighteenth century, and its short-lived popularity. This is in the context of both historical research and an examination of a small number of shop windows that survive. It considers how variations in style and design offer an insight into the influences on early shop windows and considers whether architectural fashion was more of a defining factor than the practical side of retailing. R e t a i l i n g i n E i g h t e e n t h - C e n t u ry S c o t l a n d Henry Grey Graham in his observations on eighteenth-century Scotland describes the desperate state of the country

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2009

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