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Robert Mylne at Pitlour House

Robert Mylne at Pitlour House Robert Mylne (1733–1811) never had the social standing, and subsequent ability, to secure the prestigious architectural commissions of his Edinburgh contemporary Robert Adam (1728–1792). Consequently, despite his numerous worksforthe Duke of Argyll and other successes such as St Cecilia's Hall in Edinburgh, 1761–3, his career was predominantly involved with civil engineering projects. Pitlour House in Fife represents one of his few complete house commissions and offers an opportunity to consider Mylne's severe, puristform of neo-classicism in an architectural context. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Robert Mylne at Pitlour House

Architectural Heritage , Volume 12 (12): 27 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2001.12.12.27
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Robert Mylne (1733–1811) never had the social standing, and subsequent ability, to secure the prestigious architectural commissions of his Edinburgh contemporary Robert Adam (1728–1792). Consequently, despite his numerous worksforthe Duke of Argyll and other successes such as St Cecilia's Hall in Edinburgh, 1761–3, his career was predominantly involved with civil engineering projects. Pitlour House in Fife represents one of his few complete house commissions and offers an opportunity to consider Mylne's severe, puristform of neo-classicism in an architectural context.

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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