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Response to Responses

Response to Responses Michael Kindellan and Joshua Kotin We are grateful for the challenging responses from Charles Altieri, Alan Golding, Marjorie Perloff, and Steven G. Yao and Michael Coyle. We first presented our essay at the Ezra Pound International Conference (EPIC) in 2015. Golding responded and Perloff chaired the panel. A lively discussion ensued, kicked off by Altieri’s comments about poetry’s general resistance to pedagogy. Yao and Coyle were also present, and their book, Ezra Pound and Education (2012), served as an important impetus for our research. This forum is thus a continuation of an ongoing discussion. We are also grateful to the editors of Modernist Cultures for hosting the forum, and for their editorial guidance. The most prevalent criticism of our essay is that we define pedagogy too narrowly. (‘How many poets’, Altieri asks, ‘would pass Kindellan and Kotin’s tests for adequate pedagogy?’) But when we wrote our essay, we worried that our definition was too broad. The Cantos, we argued, ‘is not compatible with any conceivable model of education – from what Paulo Freire calls the “banking concept of education’’ to his emancipatory alternative, “the problem-posing concept of education.’’’ Freire, here, is not meant to represent mutually exclusive models of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Response to Responses

Modernist Cultures , Volume 12 (3): 3 – Nov 1, 2017

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2017.0183
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Michael Kindellan and Joshua Kotin We are grateful for the challenging responses from Charles Altieri, Alan Golding, Marjorie Perloff, and Steven G. Yao and Michael Coyle. We first presented our essay at the Ezra Pound International Conference (EPIC) in 2015. Golding responded and Perloff chaired the panel. A lively discussion ensued, kicked off by Altieri’s comments about poetry’s general resistance to pedagogy. Yao and Coyle were also present, and their book, Ezra Pound and Education (2012), served as an important impetus for our research. This forum is thus a continuation of an ongoing discussion. We are also grateful to the editors of Modernist Cultures for hosting the forum, and for their editorial guidance. The most prevalent criticism of our essay is that we define pedagogy too narrowly. (‘How many poets’, Altieri asks, ‘would pass Kindellan and Kotin’s tests for adequate pedagogy?’) But when we wrote our essay, we worried that our definition was too broad. The Cantos, we argued, ‘is not compatible with any conceivable model of education – from what Paulo Freire calls the “banking concept of education’’ to his emancipatory alternative, “the problem-posing concept of education.’’’ Freire, here, is not meant to represent mutually exclusive models of

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2017

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