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Recovering ‘the Decent Pleasures of Heart and Mind’: Placing the forgotten architectural culture of seventeenth century Scotland in its European context

Recovering ‘the Decent Pleasures of Heart and Mind’: Placing the forgotten architectural culture... Charles McKean Foreword Recovering ‘the Decent Pleasures of Heart and Mind’: Placing the forgotten architectural culture of seventeenth century Scotland in its European context University of Dundee, 10–11 November 2006 The tone of the 2006 conference into the later Scottish Renaissance was set by the quotation from the great inscription in the privy garden wall of Chancellor Seton’s majestic villa of Pinkie, Musselburgh: that he had ‘brought everything together that might afford decent pleasures of heart and mind’ – namely a fountain of pure water, a grove, pools and other things that might add to the pleasures of the place. It was with a focus on the pleasures of heart and mind that we celebrated the previous 15 years’ revolution in understanding how Scotland participated in the Renaissance. Earlier attitudes varied from that adopted by the Royal Museum until the 1980s – namely the Middle Ages ended in 1700 when the modern era began – to the interminable castellologists and those of the primitive persuasion – namely that Scotland had been isolated if not barbaric during the Renaissance and that the simple presence of a tower – that signifier of Scots mediaeval lordship – necessarily implied defence. It http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Recovering ‘the Decent Pleasures of Heart and Mind’: Placing the forgotten architectural culture of seventeenth century Scotland in its European context

Architectural Heritage , Volume 18 (1): vii – Nov 1, 2007

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Foreword
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2007.18.1.vii
Publisher site
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Abstract

Charles McKean Foreword Recovering ‘the Decent Pleasures of Heart and Mind’: Placing the forgotten architectural culture of seventeenth century Scotland in its European context University of Dundee, 10–11 November 2006 The tone of the 2006 conference into the later Scottish Renaissance was set by the quotation from the great inscription in the privy garden wall of Chancellor Seton’s majestic villa of Pinkie, Musselburgh: that he had ‘brought everything together that might afford decent pleasures of heart and mind’ – namely a fountain of pure water, a grove, pools and other things that might add to the pleasures of the place. It was with a focus on the pleasures of heart and mind that we celebrated the previous 15 years’ revolution in understanding how Scotland participated in the Renaissance. Earlier attitudes varied from that adopted by the Royal Museum until the 1980s – namely the Middle Ages ended in 1700 when the modern era began – to the interminable castellologists and those of the primitive persuasion – namely that Scotland had been isolated if not barbaric during the Renaissance and that the simple presence of a tower – that signifier of Scots mediaeval lordship – necessarily implied defence. It

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2007

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