Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

R. J. Morris's Nation within a Nation

R. J. Morris's Nation within a Nation International Review of Scottish Studies 48.1 (2023): 11–12 DOI: 10.3366/irss.2023.0004 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/irss Graeme Morton Perhaps there is a link between urban historians and horticulture. For Gil Stelter, a long-time friend and colleague in Guelph, it comes from perfecting his skills as a daylily hybridizer; for Bob Morris, it came in the form of apples, notably those that thrived in the soil of the Scottish Borders, as well as his early adoption of the Apple Mac to replant the discipline of ‘history and computing’ from the distant mainframe to the fertile environment of the corner desk. The loss of Bob Morris is profound, and he leaves a rich legacy throughout the Scottish historical community. I am one of those who owe an enormous professional but even more significant personal debt to Bob. This connection stems from my days taking down notes from his lectures in ‘Social History 1’ at Edinburgh University, through to my doctoral research, and then academic career, collaborating with Bob on histories of urban Scotland, civil society, and the Scottish nation. Insatiably curious, and intellectually generous, Bob Morris embedded in the historiography the cornerstones of urban development as ‘new spaces for Scotland.’ While he http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Review of Scottish Studies Edinburgh University Press

R. J. Morris's Nation within a Nation

International Review of Scottish Studies , Volume 48 (1): 2 – Jun 1, 2023

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/r-j-morris-s-nation-within-a-nation-J5aMZ5hul6

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1923-5755
eISSN
1923-5763
DOI
10.3366/irss.2023.0004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International Review of Scottish Studies 48.1 (2023): 11–12 DOI: 10.3366/irss.2023.0004 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/irss Graeme Morton Perhaps there is a link between urban historians and horticulture. For Gil Stelter, a long-time friend and colleague in Guelph, it comes from perfecting his skills as a daylily hybridizer; for Bob Morris, it came in the form of apples, notably those that thrived in the soil of the Scottish Borders, as well as his early adoption of the Apple Mac to replant the discipline of ‘history and computing’ from the distant mainframe to the fertile environment of the corner desk. The loss of Bob Morris is profound, and he leaves a rich legacy throughout the Scottish historical community. I am one of those who owe an enormous professional but even more significant personal debt to Bob. This connection stems from my days taking down notes from his lectures in ‘Social History 1’ at Edinburgh University, through to my doctoral research, and then academic career, collaborating with Bob on histories of urban Scotland, civil society, and the Scottish nation. Insatiably curious, and intellectually generous, Bob Morris embedded in the historiography the cornerstones of urban development as ‘new spaces for Scotland.’ While he

Journal

International Review of Scottish StudiesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2023

There are no references for this article.