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R. J. Morris

R. J. Morris International Review of Scottish Studies 48.1 (2023): 15 DOI: 10.3366/irss.2023.0006 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/irss Hannah Barker I have been familiar with Bob’s work as a historian since my days as a doctoral student in the early 1990s. His Class, Sect and Party, and later, Men, Women and Property in England, in addition to his many articles and book chapters on middle-class urban society, were important texts for me as a young historian interested in northern English towns. I did not know Bob Morris well, nor was he ever a colleague, but I represent what I suspect was a large number of scholars who were the recipients of Bob’s generous help and encouragement over the years. When I approached him out of the blue in the early 2000s to ask about his work on wills, he took time to talk to me about his work and how it might illuminate some of the issues with which I was grappling. A decade later, he was equally happy for me to pick his brains about the internal organization of buildings amongst what he called the ‘urban peasantry,’ town dwellers who centred their life-cycle strategies on the accumulation of land located within their immediate locality, and amongst whom, Bob argued, craftsmen and shopkeepers—the focus of my own research—were typical. Finally, he was perhaps the only person who was willing, and indeed happy, to talk to me (at a level of detail that lesser men than Bob might have considered excessive) about house numbering conventions in nineteenth-century northern towns. Bob Morris was an important and influential historian, but he also reflected the intellectual curiosity and generosity of spirit to which we should all aspire. HANNAH BARKER, Professor of British History, University of Manchester. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Review of Scottish Studies Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1923-5755
eISSN
1923-5763
DOI
10.3366/irss.2023.0006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International Review of Scottish Studies 48.1 (2023): 15 DOI: 10.3366/irss.2023.0006 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/irss Hannah Barker I have been familiar with Bob’s work as a historian since my days as a doctoral student in the early 1990s. His Class, Sect and Party, and later, Men, Women and Property in England, in addition to his many articles and book chapters on middle-class urban society, were important texts for me as a young historian interested in northern English towns. I did not know Bob Morris well, nor was he ever a colleague, but I represent what I suspect was a large number of scholars who were the recipients of Bob’s generous help and encouragement over the years. When I approached him out of the blue in the early 2000s to ask about his work on wills, he took time to talk to me about his work and how it might illuminate some of the issues with which I was grappling. A decade later, he was equally happy for me to pick his brains about the internal organization of buildings amongst what he called the ‘urban peasantry,’ town dwellers who centred their life-cycle strategies on the accumulation of land located within their immediate locality, and amongst whom, Bob argued, craftsmen and shopkeepers—the focus of my own research—were typical. Finally, he was perhaps the only person who was willing, and indeed happy, to talk to me (at a level of detail that lesser men than Bob might have considered excessive) about house numbering conventions in nineteenth-century northern towns. Bob Morris was an important and influential historian, but he also reflected the intellectual curiosity and generosity of spirit to which we should all aspire. HANNAH BARKER, Professor of British History, University of Manchester.

Journal

International Review of Scottish StudiesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2023

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