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Preface

Preface This volume of Architectural Heritage is the first to benefit from a streamlined Editorial Board and an expanded Panel of Specialist Advisors, who are all experts and leaders in the field of Scottish architectural history and conservation. From this Heritage will have been formally approved by the editorial practice of previous volumes. The aim referees, making explicit is not to narrow the subject range or over-intellectualise the process or content but instead to support the editor in ensuring that all papers bring new information, opinions and research to light. As part of this process themed conferences may not, as previously, be published en bloc, but instead a selection may be made ensuring that only previously unpublished material reaches the page. The new structure will continue and enhance the aims of the ahss Journal, not solely as a Society publication but a major national resource in encouraging and highlighting newresearch into the history and conservation of our architectural heritage. The Journal series will stand as a mark of current thinking, as a provocation for further thought and study, and as an inspiration and intellectual backbone for the conservation, protection and re-use of our historic built fabric. In its own way it should also serve to encourage, by an appreciation of past achievements, excellent architecture for the present and the future. Volume IX embraces this new structure, being composed of five papers from the Society's national conference, held at Edinburgh College of Art in March 1997, on the theme of 'Nationality and Scottish Architecture', and three unrelated papers. The conference papers, given Scotland's current position on the brink of holding her ow n Parliament, take a timely look at the issue of nationalism as it was seen and expressed by some of Scotland's finest designers and architectural thinkers —The Earl of Mar, Alexander 'Greek' Thomson, Robert Row and Anderson, Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Robert Matthew, as well as exploring the national identity of post-Reformation Scotland. In the non-conference papers the fascinating tale of a good dust-up between the architect and sculptor members of the Royal Scottish Academy is related, and the form and function of wooden frontages in the mideighteenth century is investigated. Finally, Ian Gow, much-loved and respected Curator of Collections at the National Monuments Record of Scotland, explores the conservation of the historic interior, in a paper commissioned by the Society prior to his recent move to become Curator of the National Trust for Scotland. one or more volume forward, every paper in Architectural vii http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Preface

Architectural Heritage , Volume 9 (9): vii – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.1998.9.9.vii
Publisher site
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Abstract

This volume of Architectural Heritage is the first to benefit from a streamlined Editorial Board and an expanded Panel of Specialist Advisors, who are all experts and leaders in the field of Scottish architectural history and conservation. From this Heritage will have been formally approved by the editorial practice of previous volumes. The aim referees, making explicit is not to narrow the subject range or over-intellectualise the process or content but instead to support the editor in ensuring that all papers bring new information, opinions and research to light. As part of this process themed conferences may not, as previously, be published en bloc, but instead a selection may be made ensuring that only previously unpublished material reaches the page. The new structure will continue and enhance the aims of the ahss Journal, not solely as a Society publication but a major national resource in encouraging and highlighting newresearch into the history and conservation of our architectural heritage. The Journal series will stand as a mark of current thinking, as a provocation for further thought and study, and as an inspiration and intellectual backbone for the conservation, protection and re-use of our historic built fabric. In its own way it should also serve to encourage, by an appreciation of past achievements, excellent architecture for the present and the future. Volume IX embraces this new structure, being composed of five papers from the Society's national conference, held at Edinburgh College of Art in March 1997, on the theme of 'Nationality and Scottish Architecture', and three unrelated papers. The conference papers, given Scotland's current position on the brink of holding her ow n Parliament, take a timely look at the issue of nationalism as it was seen and expressed by some of Scotland's finest designers and architectural thinkers —The Earl of Mar, Alexander 'Greek' Thomson, Robert Row and Anderson, Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Robert Matthew, as well as exploring the national identity of post-Reformation Scotland. In the non-conference papers the fascinating tale of a good dust-up between the architect and sculptor members of the Royal Scottish Academy is related, and the form and function of wooden frontages in the mideighteenth century is investigated. Finally, Ian Gow, much-loved and respected Curator of Collections at the National Monuments Record of Scotland, explores the conservation of the historic interior, in a paper commissioned by the Society prior to his recent move to become Curator of the National Trust for Scotland. one or more volume forward, every paper in Architectural vii

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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