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Old habits, new dynamics: a case study of Web 2.0 in collaborative humanities and arts research

Old habits, new dynamics: a case study of Web 2.0 in collaborative humanities and arts research <jats:p> Whilst the application of online multimedia digital technology within arts and humanities research has burgeoned over the last decade, the practice of openly conducting collaborative and in particular discursive research publicly online remains one of the most unfamiliar and conceptually problematic areas for many academics in the field. Based on user surveys, blog posts, and forum discussions, this article provides both an account and assessment of Web 2.0 technologies in use on a large-scale arts and humanities research project. Examining usage by and impressions of both the project team and the wider community of users, it investigates both the advantages gained and problems faced through the use of a virtual research environment (VRE). It also pays special attention to the use of video and its implications for research practices. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

Old habits, new dynamics: a case study of Web 2.0 in collaborative humanities and arts research

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press and the Association for History and Computing 2011
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/ijhac.2011.0029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> Whilst the application of online multimedia digital technology within arts and humanities research has burgeoned over the last decade, the practice of openly conducting collaborative and in particular discursive research publicly online remains one of the most unfamiliar and conceptually problematic areas for many academics in the field. Based on user surveys, blog posts, and forum discussions, this article provides both an account and assessment of Web 2.0 technologies in use on a large-scale arts and humanities research project. Examining usage by and impressions of both the project team and the wider community of users, it investigates both the advantages gained and problems faced through the use of a virtual research environment (VRE). It also pays special attention to the use of video and its implications for research practices. </jats:p>

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2011

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