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Musicology after Deleuze: Response to Brian Hulse's Review of Music after Deleuze – All Music is ‘Deleuzian’

Musicology after Deleuze: Response to Brian Hulse's Review of Music after Deleuze – All Music is... Deleuze, Gilles (2004) `How Do We Recognize Structuralism?', in Desert Islands and Other Texts: 1953­1974, Cambridge: Semiotext(e), pp. 170­192. Hasty, Christopher (1997) Meter as Rhythm. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Hulse and Nesbitt (2010) Sounding the Virtual: Gilles Deleuze and the Theory and Philosophy of Music, Burlington, VT: Ashgate. Straus, Joseph N. (1990) Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Musicology after Deleuze: Response to Brian Hulse's Review of Music after Deleuze ­ All Music is `Deleuzian' Brian Hulse concludes his review noting that `much remains to be done'. On this we can agree and, in saying so, he hits pretty much the note on which I conclude Music after Deleuze. Our disagreement concerns the precise nature of what exactly has been done and what remains to be done. Hulse is committed to a retheorising of sound/music in the light of Deleuzian thought and he expresses the desirability of recalibrating Deleuze's philosophy in relation to musical modernity. While I have never equated Deleuzian philosophy with musical modernism, I do not share his conviction that Deleuze's relationship with modernity is fundamentally problematic and, for me, Deleuze's engagement with non-musical modernism in Mallarmé, Proust, Kafka, Joyce, Beckett and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Deleuze Studies Edinburgh University Press

Musicology after Deleuze: Response to Brian Hulse's Review of Music after Deleuze – All Music is ‘Deleuzian’

Deleuze Studies , Volume 9 (1): 145 – Feb 1, 2015

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Book Reviews; Philosophy and Religion
ISSN
1750-2241
eISSN
1755-1684
DOI
10.3366/dls.2015.0178
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Deleuze, Gilles (2004) `How Do We Recognize Structuralism?', in Desert Islands and Other Texts: 1953­1974, Cambridge: Semiotext(e), pp. 170­192. Hasty, Christopher (1997) Meter as Rhythm. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Hulse and Nesbitt (2010) Sounding the Virtual: Gilles Deleuze and the Theory and Philosophy of Music, Burlington, VT: Ashgate. Straus, Joseph N. (1990) Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Musicology after Deleuze: Response to Brian Hulse's Review of Music after Deleuze ­ All Music is `Deleuzian' Brian Hulse concludes his review noting that `much remains to be done'. On this we can agree and, in saying so, he hits pretty much the note on which I conclude Music after Deleuze. Our disagreement concerns the precise nature of what exactly has been done and what remains to be done. Hulse is committed to a retheorising of sound/music in the light of Deleuzian thought and he expresses the desirability of recalibrating Deleuze's philosophy in relation to musical modernity. While I have never equated Deleuzian philosophy with musical modernism, I do not share his conviction that Deleuze's relationship with modernity is fundamentally problematic and, for me, Deleuze's engagement with non-musical modernism in Mallarmé, Proust, Kafka, Joyce, Beckett and

Journal

Deleuze StudiesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2015

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