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Municipal Perspective, Royal Expectations, and the Use of Public Space: The Case of the West Port, Edinburgh, 1503–1633

Municipal Perspective, Royal Expectations, and the Use of Public Space: The Case of the West... Giovanna Guidicini Scottish triumphal entries were regularly staged in Edinburgh between 1503 and 1633, representing the constant renegotiation of the relationship between ruler and municipal authorities. The evolution of this relationship was publicly staged in the public spaces and streets of the city during triumphal entries. This piece will discuss the significance of particular buildings as urban landmarks representing the values of the bourgeois community, in particular of the West Port. An unusual and challenging use of urban space by Queen Mary Stuart in 1561 represented an attempt to tip the balance of power between royal and urban authority in the sovereigns’ favour. The straightforward opposition of the municipal authorities to such a defiant act, and the measures adopted to counterbalance it, emphasise the general awareness of the importance of controlling urban spaces to proclaim absolute power or to defend traditional independence. Triumphal entries staged in Edinburgh between 1503 and 1633 represented key opportunities for the public staging of politicised dialogues between the city authorities and the Scottish sovereign. The burgh’s urban spaces and the historical landmarks, around which the processions and the triumphal stations were organised, became the battlefield on which the balance between royal and civic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Municipal Perspective, Royal Expectations, and the Use of Public Space: The Case of the West Port, Edinburgh, 1503–1633

Architectural Heritage , Volume 22 (1): 37 – Nov 1, 2011

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2011
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2011.0017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Giovanna Guidicini Scottish triumphal entries were regularly staged in Edinburgh between 1503 and 1633, representing the constant renegotiation of the relationship between ruler and municipal authorities. The evolution of this relationship was publicly staged in the public spaces and streets of the city during triumphal entries. This piece will discuss the significance of particular buildings as urban landmarks representing the values of the bourgeois community, in particular of the West Port. An unusual and challenging use of urban space by Queen Mary Stuart in 1561 represented an attempt to tip the balance of power between royal and urban authority in the sovereigns’ favour. The straightforward opposition of the municipal authorities to such a defiant act, and the measures adopted to counterbalance it, emphasise the general awareness of the importance of controlling urban spaces to proclaim absolute power or to defend traditional independence. Triumphal entries staged in Edinburgh between 1503 and 1633 represented key opportunities for the public staging of politicised dialogues between the city authorities and the Scottish sovereign. The burgh’s urban spaces and the historical landmarks, around which the processions and the triumphal stations were organised, became the battlefield on which the balance between royal and civic

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2011

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