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Miles Glendinning and David Page, Clone City: Crisis and Renewal in Contemporary Scottish Architecture , Polygon, Edinburgh, 1999, ISBN 0 7486 6255 3. £11.99.

Miles Glendinning and David Page, Clone City: Crisis and Renewal in Contemporary Scottish... Miles and David Page, Clone City: Crisis and Renewal in Scottish Architecture, Polygon, Edinburgh, 1999, ISBN o 7486 Contemporary 62cc 3. £1 1.99. Glendinning Picture this description of the urban condition in our Post-modern world: 'unending layers of fetishistically seductive surfaces or images, an alienating and disorientating labyrinth which draws us in further and further and destroys all certainties'. Welcome to Clone City, Miles Glendinning and David Page's zeitgeisty analysis of the malaise of our built environment. Why cloning? Because it is the ultimate symbol of 'regimentation and anarchy' and when applied to cities it represents that stage of 'frenzied fragmented reproduction of a Utopia about to be overthrown'. Glendinning even gives us some newspaper collages showing regiments of sheep, juxtaposed with Mockintosh motifs, estate agent lingo, and tatty developer housing schemes. Philip Larkin said it's rare metaphor that doesn't bore after about three lines, how well does Clone City stand up? Glendinning and Page present with three developments of the Clone City. In the Historicist Age (eighteenth to nineteenth century) new, specialised types of building, embodying a new industrial hierarchy replaced the old burgh, with its tolbooth and church. In the Clone Stage, however, this Utopia degenerated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Miles Glendinning and David Page, Clone City: Crisis and Renewal in Contemporary Scottish Architecture , Polygon, Edinburgh, 1999, ISBN 0 7486 6255 3. £11.99.

Architectural Heritage , Volume 11 (11): 94 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Reviews
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2000.0009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Miles and David Page, Clone City: Crisis and Renewal in Scottish Architecture, Polygon, Edinburgh, 1999, ISBN o 7486 Contemporary 62cc 3. £1 1.99. Glendinning Picture this description of the urban condition in our Post-modern world: 'unending layers of fetishistically seductive surfaces or images, an alienating and disorientating labyrinth which draws us in further and further and destroys all certainties'. Welcome to Clone City, Miles Glendinning and David Page's zeitgeisty analysis of the malaise of our built environment. Why cloning? Because it is the ultimate symbol of 'regimentation and anarchy' and when applied to cities it represents that stage of 'frenzied fragmented reproduction of a Utopia about to be overthrown'. Glendinning even gives us some newspaper collages showing regiments of sheep, juxtaposed with Mockintosh motifs, estate agent lingo, and tatty developer housing schemes. Philip Larkin said it's rare metaphor that doesn't bore after about three lines, how well does Clone City stand up? Glendinning and Page present with three developments of the Clone City. In the Historicist Age (eighteenth to nineteenth century) new, specialised types of building, embodying a new industrial hierarchy replaced the old burgh, with its tolbooth and church. In the Clone Stage, however, this Utopia degenerated

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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