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Max Saunders, Self-Impression: Life-Writing, Autobiografiction, and the Forms of Modern Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010). 563 pp. ISBN: 9780199579761.

Max Saunders, Self-Impression: Life-Writing, Autobiografiction, and the Forms of Modern... Modernist Cultures objective, the possible and the impossible, presence and absence, desire and loss, celebration and deploration’ (32). Using Husserl’s and Ricoeur’s work on ‘horizons’, Collot argues against formalist literary theories which see the text as a closed object. According to Collot, the phenomenological notion of horizon ‘enables us to understand that writing can both reveal and re-invent our experience’ (332). Bourne-Taylor considers the poetry and philosophy of the ‘poet-moralist’ Deguy. For Deguy (like Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Ricoeur), meaning originates in the other, in alterity. Through his ‘intertwining of poetry and ethics’, Deguy ‘urges us to rediscover the merits of perplexity and recognise the burden of our responsibility towards the world’ (361). Phenomenology, Modernism and Beyond is a multifarious, scholarly, and rigorous essay collection. However, sometimes its philosophical rigour is a little alienating, which may be off-putting for readers who are unfamiliar with phenomenology. The editors do a fantastic job of explaining key phenomenological concepts in their introduction, but there is only so much that can be covered in a thirty-four page preamble. Even if readers do find some of the passages a bit hardgoing, there is much to be gained from the contributors’ erudite analyses of modernist http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Max Saunders, Self-Impression: Life-Writing, Autobiografiction, and the Forms of Modern Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010). 563 pp. ISBN: 9780199579761.

Modernist Cultures , Volume 6 (2): 342 – Oct 1, 2011

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2011
Subject
Book Reviews; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2011.0020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Modernist Cultures objective, the possible and the impossible, presence and absence, desire and loss, celebration and deploration’ (32). Using Husserl’s and Ricoeur’s work on ‘horizons’, Collot argues against formalist literary theories which see the text as a closed object. According to Collot, the phenomenological notion of horizon ‘enables us to understand that writing can both reveal and re-invent our experience’ (332). Bourne-Taylor considers the poetry and philosophy of the ‘poet-moralist’ Deguy. For Deguy (like Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Ricoeur), meaning originates in the other, in alterity. Through his ‘intertwining of poetry and ethics’, Deguy ‘urges us to rediscover the merits of perplexity and recognise the burden of our responsibility towards the world’ (361). Phenomenology, Modernism and Beyond is a multifarious, scholarly, and rigorous essay collection. However, sometimes its philosophical rigour is a little alienating, which may be off-putting for readers who are unfamiliar with phenomenology. The editors do a fantastic job of explaining key phenomenological concepts in their introduction, but there is only so much that can be covered in a thirty-four page preamble. Even if readers do find some of the passages a bit hardgoing, there is much to be gained from the contributors’ erudite analyses of modernist

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2011

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