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Making Sense of Strange Sounds: (Mutual) Intelligibility of Related Language Varieties. A Review

Making Sense of Strange Sounds: (Mutual) Intelligibility of Related Language Varieties. A Review MAKING SENSE OF STRANGE SOUNDS: (MUTUAL) INTELLIGIBILITY OF RELATED LANGUAGE VARIETIES. A REVIEW VINCENT J. VAN HEUVEN 1. introduction 1.1 Two basic questions In this paper we ask two questions, which superficially seem to ask the same thing but in actual fact do not. First, we ask to what degree two languages (or language varieties) A and B resemble each other. The second question is how well a listener of variety B understands a speaker of variety A. When we ask to what degree two language varieties resemble one another, or how different they are (which is basically the same question), it should be clear that the answer cannot be expressed in a single number. Languages differ from each other not in just one dimension but in a great many respects. They may differ in their sound inventories, in the details of the sounds in the inventory, in their stress, tone and intonation systems, in their vocabularies, and in the way they build words from morphemes and sentences from words. Last, but not least, they may differ in the meanings they attach to the forms in the language, in so far as the forms in two languages may http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

Making Sense of Strange Sounds: (Mutual) Intelligibility of Related Language Varieties. A Review

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press and the Association of History and Computing 2009
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/E1753854809000305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MAKING SENSE OF STRANGE SOUNDS: (MUTUAL) INTELLIGIBILITY OF RELATED LANGUAGE VARIETIES. A REVIEW VINCENT J. VAN HEUVEN 1. introduction 1.1 Two basic questions In this paper we ask two questions, which superficially seem to ask the same thing but in actual fact do not. First, we ask to what degree two languages (or language varieties) A and B resemble each other. The second question is how well a listener of variety B understands a speaker of variety A. When we ask to what degree two language varieties resemble one another, or how different they are (which is basically the same question), it should be clear that the answer cannot be expressed in a single number. Languages differ from each other not in just one dimension but in a great many respects. They may differ in their sound inventories, in the details of the sounds in the inventory, in their stress, tone and intonation systems, in their vocabularies, and in the way they build words from morphemes and sentences from words. Last, but not least, they may differ in the meanings they attach to the forms in the language, in so far as the forms in two languages may

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2008

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