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Locus Standi of Individuals and Non-State Entities Before Regional Economic Integration Judicial Bodies in Africa

Locus Standi of Individuals and Non-State Entities Before Regional Economic Integration Judicial... <jats:p> Economic integration efforts in Africa have been ongoing since the 1960s. In spite of the fact that judicial bodies – in the form of Courts and Tribunals – have been provided as key institutions in integration treaties, they have largely not been active in application of the treaties or addressing disputes within the economic blocs until after 2000. This was partly a result of the failure in the timely establishment of the Courts and Tribunals and partly a result of the absence or limited role of individuals and non-State entities in the integration process (and, under certain treaties, of the right of access to the Courts and Tribunals). In the past decade, mainly through protocols to the treaties, the role of individuals and non-State entities in integration has been greatly enhanced, including the grant of locus standi before the Courts and Tribunals. The recent decisions of the Courts and Tribunals under the regional economic integration blocs, especially the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), the East African Community (EAC), the Economic Community for West African States (ECOWAS) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC), have addressed the role and locus standi of individuals and non-State entities that has significant implications for the future of economic integration processes in Africa. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

Locus Standi of Individuals and Non-State Entities Before Regional Economic Integration Judicial Bodies in Africa

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2010
Subject
Articles; African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2010.0002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> Economic integration efforts in Africa have been ongoing since the 1960s. In spite of the fact that judicial bodies – in the form of Courts and Tribunals – have been provided as key institutions in integration treaties, they have largely not been active in application of the treaties or addressing disputes within the economic blocs until after 2000. This was partly a result of the failure in the timely establishment of the Courts and Tribunals and partly a result of the absence or limited role of individuals and non-State entities in the integration process (and, under certain treaties, of the right of access to the Courts and Tribunals). In the past decade, mainly through protocols to the treaties, the role of individuals and non-State entities in integration has been greatly enhanced, including the grant of locus standi before the Courts and Tribunals. The recent decisions of the Courts and Tribunals under the regional economic integration blocs, especially the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), the East African Community (EAC), the Economic Community for West African States (ECOWAS) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC), have addressed the role and locus standi of individuals and non-State entities that has significant implications for the future of economic integration processes in Africa. </jats:p>

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2010

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