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‘Listen to us’: Arguing the Case for Child Participation in NEPAD

‘Listen to us’: Arguing the Case for Child Participation in NEPAD BENYAM D. MEZMUR∗ AND JULIA SLOTH-NIELSEN ∗∗ I. INTRODUCTION Skeptics might aver that all is doom in Africa. In his book What went wrong with Africa, Van der Veen writes: The last fifty years have seen unprecedented changes in people’s standards of life all over the world. . . . Though poverty was the norm throughout human history, for many people a degree of prosperity came within reach. . . . except in Africa.1 However, two major developments that have led commentators2 to claim that Africa is poised for positive regeneration in this millennium are the adoption of the Constitutive Act of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) which established the African Union (AU), and the launch, on 23 October 2001, in Nigeria, of ‘a development strategy’ known as the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD). Thus, the ‘African renaissance’ (as it has been termed) and AU have become ‘beacons of hope’ for Africa, and NEPAD is seen by some as a historical development that meshes well with the African renaissance idea. Given its recent origin, there is already a relatively vast literature that is written on the subject matter of NEPAD.3 Supporting this conclusion, in 2004, Msoti http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

‘Listen to us’: Arguing the Case for Child Participation in NEPAD

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2009
Subject
African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/E0954889009000267
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BENYAM D. MEZMUR∗ AND JULIA SLOTH-NIELSEN ∗∗ I. INTRODUCTION Skeptics might aver that all is doom in Africa. In his book What went wrong with Africa, Van der Veen writes: The last fifty years have seen unprecedented changes in people’s standards of life all over the world. . . . Though poverty was the norm throughout human history, for many people a degree of prosperity came within reach. . . . except in Africa.1 However, two major developments that have led commentators2 to claim that Africa is poised for positive regeneration in this millennium are the adoption of the Constitutive Act of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) which established the African Union (AU), and the launch, on 23 October 2001, in Nigeria, of ‘a development strategy’ known as the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD). Thus, the ‘African renaissance’ (as it has been termed) and AU have become ‘beacons of hope’ for Africa, and NEPAD is seen by some as a historical development that meshes well with the African renaissance idea. Given its recent origin, there is already a relatively vast literature that is written on the subject matter of NEPAD.3 Supporting this conclusion, in 2004, Msoti

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2009

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