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Kristin Bluemel (ed.), Intermodernism: Literary Culture in Mid-Twentieth-Century Britain (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2009). 272pp. Hardback. ISBN: 978-0-7486-3509-2.

Kristin Bluemel (ed.), Intermodernism: Literary Culture in Mid-Twentieth-Century Britain... BOOK REVIEWS Kristin Bluemel (ed.), Intermodernism: Literary Culture in Mid-TwentiethCentury Britain (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2009). 272pp. Hardback. ISBN: 978-0-7486-3509-2. For some time now, critics have asked what happened to modernism after its canonical heyday in the 1920s. Important publications such as Keith Williams’s British Writers and the Media, 1930–45 (1996), Tyrus Miller’s Late Modernism (1999), Marina MacKay’s Modernism and World War II (2007), MacKay and Lindsay Stonebridge’s co-edited British Fiction after Modernism (2007) and Alexandra Harris’s Romantic Moderns (2010), have interrogated the seemingly monolithic nature of ‘high modernism’. These books have decentred the long dominant narrative about literary modernism which hinges on the notion of a self-reflexive, experimental écriture by examining modernism’s artistic responses to the diverse historical, social, and political pressures of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. Kristin Bluemel has been prominent among these revisionist scholars. Her book George Orwell and the Radical Eccentrics: Intermodernism in Literary London (2004) advanced the concept of ‘intermodernism’ to describe the works of post-1920s authors who were located on the margins of (and often in opposition to) the cultural establishment and whose writings don’t fit the conventional categories of high-, middle-, and lowbrow. Most importantly, however, Bluemel’s ‘intermodernism’ aims to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Kristin Bluemel (ed.), Intermodernism: Literary Culture in Mid-Twentieth-Century Britain (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2009). 272pp. Hardback. ISBN: 978-0-7486-3509-2.

Modernist Cultures , Volume 6 (1): 196 – May 1, 2011

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2011
Subject
Book Reviews; Film, Media & Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2011.0010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Kristin Bluemel (ed.), Intermodernism: Literary Culture in Mid-TwentiethCentury Britain (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2009). 272pp. Hardback. ISBN: 978-0-7486-3509-2. For some time now, critics have asked what happened to modernism after its canonical heyday in the 1920s. Important publications such as Keith Williams’s British Writers and the Media, 1930–45 (1996), Tyrus Miller’s Late Modernism (1999), Marina MacKay’s Modernism and World War II (2007), MacKay and Lindsay Stonebridge’s co-edited British Fiction after Modernism (2007) and Alexandra Harris’s Romantic Moderns (2010), have interrogated the seemingly monolithic nature of ‘high modernism’. These books have decentred the long dominant narrative about literary modernism which hinges on the notion of a self-reflexive, experimental écriture by examining modernism’s artistic responses to the diverse historical, social, and political pressures of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. Kristin Bluemel has been prominent among these revisionist scholars. Her book George Orwell and the Radical Eccentrics: Intermodernism in Literary London (2004) advanced the concept of ‘intermodernism’ to describe the works of post-1920s authors who were located on the margins of (and often in opposition to) the cultural establishment and whose writings don’t fit the conventional categories of high-, middle-, and lowbrow. Most importantly, however, Bluemel’s ‘intermodernism’ aims to

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2011

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