Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Kodak Modernism: Avant-Garde Poetry in the Age of Popular Photography

Kodak Modernism: Avant-Garde Poetry in the Age of Popular Photography Elena Gualtieri In June 1924 Blaise Cendrars was visiting Brazil when he received the first edition of his latest collection of poems, Kodak. Published by Stock with a cover design by Frans Masereel and frontispiece portrait by Francis Picabia, Kodak comprised sixty-three poems that looked like simple vignettes caught by the poet during his travels to the U.S. and beyond, and put down on paper with the apparent immediacy and directness of a tourist's photographic record. The poems' easy charm was, however, lost on the makers of the Kodak. At the publication of the book, Stock received `a notarised letter from the American firm of Kodak Co' which objected to the unauthorised use of their registered trademark. The publishers replied that they believed it acceptable `to use a commercial name once that name has acquired the sense of an object in everyday language', and that the company itself had made of the commercial name `the synonym of the photographic apparatus that accompanies the traveller'.1 Their position was that the appearance of `Kodak' on Cendrars's title-page was effectively providing free publicity for the company. For the Kodak lawyers, though, such unlicensed use of their trademark was `on the contrary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Kodak Modernism: Avant-Garde Poetry in the Age of Popular Photography

Modernist Cultures , Volume 7 (2): 180 – Oct 1, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/kodak-modernism-avant-garde-poetry-in-the-age-of-popular-photography-GNWWANddNm
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2012
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2012.0038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Elena Gualtieri In June 1924 Blaise Cendrars was visiting Brazil when he received the first edition of his latest collection of poems, Kodak. Published by Stock with a cover design by Frans Masereel and frontispiece portrait by Francis Picabia, Kodak comprised sixty-three poems that looked like simple vignettes caught by the poet during his travels to the U.S. and beyond, and put down on paper with the apparent immediacy and directness of a tourist's photographic record. The poems' easy charm was, however, lost on the makers of the Kodak. At the publication of the book, Stock received `a notarised letter from the American firm of Kodak Co' which objected to the unauthorised use of their registered trademark. The publishers replied that they believed it acceptable `to use a commercial name once that name has acquired the sense of an object in everyday language', and that the company itself had made of the commercial name `the synonym of the photographic apparatus that accompanies the traveller'.1 Their position was that the appearance of `Kodak' on Cendrars's title-page was effectively providing free publicity for the company. For the Kodak lawyers, though, such unlicensed use of their trademark was `on the contrary

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.