Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Kevin DeYoung, The Religious Formation of John Witherspoon: Calvinism, Evangelicalism, and the Scottish Enlightenment

Kevin DeYoung, The Religious Formation of John Witherspoon: Calvinism, Evangelicalism, and the... 68 REVIEWS from the 1740s (p. 9), and the book itself tends to emphasise the differences rather than the similarities between them. While it is to be hoped that future scholarship will probe the relationship between these two intellectual movements in greater depth, the conclusion does offer a revealing sketch of the long-term legacy of early Enlightenment scholarship on nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Scottish historio- graphy (pp. 296–300). In sum, this erudite and beautifully written book restores the antiquarian achievements of Scotland’s religious and political minorities to the historical record, and places the intellectual and cultural history of early eighteenth-century Scotland in a fresh perspective. Felicity Loughlin, University of St Andrews DOI: 10.3366/sch.2021.0046 Kevin DeYoung, The Religious Formation of John Witherspoon: Calvinism, Evangelicalism, and the Scottish Enlightenment. New York: Routledge, 2020. x + 211 pp. £96 hardback. ISBN: 9780367350895. Few Scottish-American figures from the eighteenth century have garnered the kind of attention – both hagiographic and critical – as the Church of Scotland minister-cum-American Founding Father John Witherspoon (1723–94). Witherspoon is most widely known as the only ordained minister to sign the Declaration of Independence, and most often associ- ated with the introduction of Scottish thought into American politics http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

Kevin DeYoung, The Religious Formation of John Witherspoon: Calvinism, Evangelicalism, and the Scottish Enlightenment

Scottish Church History , Volume 50 (1): 3 – Apr 1, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/kevin-deyoung-the-religious-formation-of-john-witherspoon-calvinism-et7EPKXMG6

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2021.0047
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

68 REVIEWS from the 1740s (p. 9), and the book itself tends to emphasise the differences rather than the similarities between them. While it is to be hoped that future scholarship will probe the relationship between these two intellectual movements in greater depth, the conclusion does offer a revealing sketch of the long-term legacy of early Enlightenment scholarship on nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Scottish historio- graphy (pp. 296–300). In sum, this erudite and beautifully written book restores the antiquarian achievements of Scotland’s religious and political minorities to the historical record, and places the intellectual and cultural history of early eighteenth-century Scotland in a fresh perspective. Felicity Loughlin, University of St Andrews DOI: 10.3366/sch.2021.0046 Kevin DeYoung, The Religious Formation of John Witherspoon: Calvinism, Evangelicalism, and the Scottish Enlightenment. New York: Routledge, 2020. x + 211 pp. £96 hardback. ISBN: 9780367350895. Few Scottish-American figures from the eighteenth century have garnered the kind of attention – both hagiographic and critical – as the Church of Scotland minister-cum-American Founding Father John Witherspoon (1723–94). Witherspoon is most widely known as the only ordained minister to sign the Declaration of Independence, and most often associ- ated with the introduction of Scottish thought into American politics

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2021

There are no references for this article.