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Joycean Fire

Joycean Fire Enda Duffy He merely gives proper weight to those intangibles of culture which, because they are not easily pinned down in words, are often passed over. The way that people live in their bodies. The way they move their hands. The way they walk. The way they smile or frown [. . . ] The way they touch each other; how the hand lingers; the feel of the fingers J. M. Coetzee, Elizabeth Costello I am caught in this burning scene James Joyce, Ulysses, `Aeolus'1 This is an essay about how James Joyce played with fire. In a recent book on Finnegans Wake, in which the author, George Gibson, sets out to prove that Joyce is indebted in his final work to the ancient Irish stories about the High Kings at Tara, he dwells on how important Ireland's greatest historical story of fire matters to Joyce.2 This story tells of how St. Patrick, on the eve of Easter in 432 AD, on the Hill of Slane in County Meath, lit the pascal fire and thus announced the arrival of Christianity to Ireland. This fire, seen through the darkness from his fortress on Tara, angered the high King, who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Joycean Fire

Modernist Cultures , Volume 7 (2): 160 – Oct 1, 2012

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2012
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2012.0037
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Enda Duffy He merely gives proper weight to those intangibles of culture which, because they are not easily pinned down in words, are often passed over. The way that people live in their bodies. The way they move their hands. The way they walk. The way they smile or frown [. . . ] The way they touch each other; how the hand lingers; the feel of the fingers J. M. Coetzee, Elizabeth Costello I am caught in this burning scene James Joyce, Ulysses, `Aeolus'1 This is an essay about how James Joyce played with fire. In a recent book on Finnegans Wake, in which the author, George Gibson, sets out to prove that Joyce is indebted in his final work to the ancient Irish stories about the High Kings at Tara, he dwells on how important Ireland's greatest historical story of fire matters to Joyce.2 This story tells of how St. Patrick, on the eve of Easter in 432 AD, on the Hill of Slane in County Meath, lit the pascal fire and thus announced the arrival of Christianity to Ireland. This fire, seen through the darkness from his fortress on Tara, angered the high King, who

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2012

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