Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Jonathan Scott, The Pleasures of Antiquity: British Collectors of Greece and Rome

Jonathan Scott, The Pleasures of Antiquity: British Collectors of Greece and Rome Reviews Jonathan Scott, The Pleasures of Antiquity: British Collectors of Greece and Rome, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art/Yale University Press, ,     . £. Dr Johnson believed that: ‘All of our religion, all our arts, almost all that sets us above the savages has come from the shores of the Mediterranean.’ His unflinching zeal for the Classical world (and Ancient Rome in particular) is wholly characteristic of Britain in the eighteenth century. Its quintessential expression was the ‘Grand Tour’ to Italy to see the sites of Imperial Rome; an essential aspect of any rounded education. They read the guide books, were tutored by scholars and viewed the sites with engaging and learned ciceroni, who introduced them to artists steeped in the visual world of the Ancients. These artists, such as Gavin Hamilton, Thomas Jenkins or Giovanni Battista Piranesi, had turned art dealers and would sell the Tourists appropriate antiquities to take home. Jonathan Scott’s fascinating survey, The Pleasures of Antiquity: British Collectors of Greece and Rome, describes how a mania for collecting antique sculpture so gripped the nation, that by the nineteenth century, Britain had amassed the finest collection of ancient sculpture http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Jonathan Scott, The Pleasures of Antiquity: British Collectors of Greece and Rome

Architectural Heritage , Volume 15 (1): 129 – Nov 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/jonathan-scott-the-pleasures-of-antiquity-british-collectors-of-greece-b69MtwF0wA
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Reviews
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2004.15.1.129
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews Jonathan Scott, The Pleasures of Antiquity: British Collectors of Greece and Rome, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art/Yale University Press, ,     . £. Dr Johnson believed that: ‘All of our religion, all our arts, almost all that sets us above the savages has come from the shores of the Mediterranean.’ His unflinching zeal for the Classical world (and Ancient Rome in particular) is wholly characteristic of Britain in the eighteenth century. Its quintessential expression was the ‘Grand Tour’ to Italy to see the sites of Imperial Rome; an essential aspect of any rounded education. They read the guide books, were tutored by scholars and viewed the sites with engaging and learned ciceroni, who introduced them to artists steeped in the visual world of the Ancients. These artists, such as Gavin Hamilton, Thomas Jenkins or Giovanni Battista Piranesi, had turned art dealers and would sell the Tourists appropriate antiquities to take home. Jonathan Scott’s fascinating survey, The Pleasures of Antiquity: British Collectors of Greece and Rome, describes how a mania for collecting antique sculpture so gripped the nation, that by the nineteenth century, Britain had amassed the finest collection of ancient sculpture

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.