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John Mylne IV (1611–1667): ‘Great Artisan, Grave Senator’

John Mylne IV (1611–1667): ‘Great Artisan, Grave Senator’ Paul Harding This paper provides a synopsis of some of the work of this Royal Master Mason, whose place in the Scottish architectural pantheon has sometimes been overlooked. Recent studies have shown him to have had almost an indispensible presence during the often tumultuous period of his career, paving the way for his better-known successors. No view of Sir William Bruce and his circle would be complete without acknowledging the figure of John Mylne standing in the shadows behind him.1 Mylne could be said to embody Scottish architectural continuity before Bruce, leading its craft-based building tradition through decades of change.2 Both their careers were founded on royal preferment, and they take their places in that great procession of Scottish royal master masons and masters of works whose appointments underlie their contributions to national architectural culture. Mylne's career was ending when Bruce's began, and spanned some of the most violent and disruptive episodes in seventeenth-century Scottish history, when normal building activities were severely affected. His architectural work was nevertheless varied and inventive, taking inspiration from many sources and overcoming major difficulties. He served in and survived a succession of wars, and had more than his share of personal tragedies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

John Mylne IV (1611–1667): ‘Great Artisan, Grave Senator’

Architectural Heritage , Volume 23 (1): 15 – Nov 1, 2012

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2012
Subject
Background; Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2012.0031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Paul Harding This paper provides a synopsis of some of the work of this Royal Master Mason, whose place in the Scottish architectural pantheon has sometimes been overlooked. Recent studies have shown him to have had almost an indispensible presence during the often tumultuous period of his career, paving the way for his better-known successors. No view of Sir William Bruce and his circle would be complete without acknowledging the figure of John Mylne standing in the shadows behind him.1 Mylne could be said to embody Scottish architectural continuity before Bruce, leading its craft-based building tradition through decades of change.2 Both their careers were founded on royal preferment, and they take their places in that great procession of Scottish royal master masons and masters of works whose appointments underlie their contributions to national architectural culture. Mylne's career was ending when Bruce's began, and spanned some of the most violent and disruptive episodes in seventeenth-century Scottish history, when normal building activities were severely affected. His architectural work was nevertheless varied and inventive, taking inspiration from many sources and overcoming major difficulties. He served in and survived a succession of wars, and had more than his share of personal tragedies.

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2012

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