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Javaid Rehman, Islamic State Practices, International Law and the Threat from Terrorism

Javaid Rehman, Islamic State Practices, International Law and the Threat from Terrorism Islamic State Practices, International Law and the Threat from Terrorism, Javaid Rehman [Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2005] pp. 256 + xx. Terrorism has a very old history, with some historians dating it as far back as ancient Greek times. Historical records reveal that adherents of cultural, nationalist, religious and secular ideologies have all, at one time or another, made their own “contributions” to terrorism in form of political or ideological violence in different parts of the world. However, it was the horrendous terrorist act of September 11 on the World Trade Centre in New York that propelled terrorism, as a global threat, to the top agenda of international law and relations. “War on terrorism” has thus become the new catchword of international relations. In relation to international law, the United Nations Secretary General, Kofi Annan, has noted copiously that terrorism is a global threat, which the United Nations has an obligation to deal with under international law. Due to the fact that the highest potential of humanity can best be realised in an atmosphere of peace, justice and non-violence, the international effort against terrorism must certainly be supported globally and pursued through international multilateral co-operation. This cooperation must not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

Javaid Rehman, Islamic State Practices, International Law and the Threat from Terrorism

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2006.14.1.136
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Islamic State Practices, International Law and the Threat from Terrorism, Javaid Rehman [Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2005] pp. 256 + xx. Terrorism has a very old history, with some historians dating it as far back as ancient Greek times. Historical records reveal that adherents of cultural, nationalist, religious and secular ideologies have all, at one time or another, made their own “contributions” to terrorism in form of political or ideological violence in different parts of the world. However, it was the horrendous terrorist act of September 11 on the World Trade Centre in New York that propelled terrorism, as a global threat, to the top agenda of international law and relations. “War on terrorism” has thus become the new catchword of international relations. In relation to international law, the United Nations Secretary General, Kofi Annan, has noted copiously that terrorism is a global threat, which the United Nations has an obligation to deal with under international law. Due to the fact that the highest potential of humanity can best be realised in an atmosphere of peace, justice and non-violence, the international effort against terrorism must certainly be supported globally and pursued through international multilateral co-operation. This cooperation must not

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2006

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