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James Smith and Rome

James Smith and Rome Cristina González-Longo The architecture of James Smith (c.1645­1731) has been misunderstood in the obsessive search for Palladianism and his direct knowledge of Roman architecture and culture has been largely overlooked. His importance was well recognised by his contemporaries: Colen Campbell called him `The most experienced architect of that kingdom' (Vitruvius Britannicus, Vol. II, 1717). After four years at the Scots College and the Collegio Romano in Rome, he rose very quickly to become the King's Surveyor and the leading architect in Scotland. This paper considers Smith's education and discusses the significance of his Roman experience not only for his own architecture but also, through his influence, for his contemporaries, for the next generation of Scottish architects and beyond. J a c o b u s S m i t h e u s M o r av i e n s i s James Smith stayed officially at the Scots College in Rome between 3 May 1671 and 3 October 1675.1 In the Oath, he confirms that he comes from Moray and that his father is also named James Smith.2 His father was a mason who became burgess of Forres in 16593 and was probably the master of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

James Smith and Rome

Architectural Heritage , Volume 23 (1): 75 – Nov 1, 2012

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2012
Subject
Bruce and his architectural contemporaries; Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2012.0034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cristina González-Longo The architecture of James Smith (c.1645­1731) has been misunderstood in the obsessive search for Palladianism and his direct knowledge of Roman architecture and culture has been largely overlooked. His importance was well recognised by his contemporaries: Colen Campbell called him `The most experienced architect of that kingdom' (Vitruvius Britannicus, Vol. II, 1717). After four years at the Scots College and the Collegio Romano in Rome, he rose very quickly to become the King's Surveyor and the leading architect in Scotland. This paper considers Smith's education and discusses the significance of his Roman experience not only for his own architecture but also, through his influence, for his contemporaries, for the next generation of Scottish architects and beyond. J a c o b u s S m i t h e u s M o r av i e n s i s James Smith stayed officially at the Scots College in Rome between 3 May 1671 and 3 October 1675.1 In the Oath, he confirms that he comes from Moray and that his father is also named James Smith.2 His father was a mason who became burgess of Forres in 16593 and was probably the master of

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2012

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