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Irish Imperial Networks: Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century India Barry Crosbie. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 301 pp., £60 (hardback)

Irish Imperial Networks: Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century India... Britain and the World 6.2 (2013): 258­275 DOI: 10.3366/brw.2013.0099 # Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/brw Print ISSN: 2043-8567; online ISSN: 2043-8575 Round-Table Irish Imperial Networks: Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century India Barry Crosbie. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 301 pp., £60 (hardback) Irish people who served the British Empire until recently seemed doomed to consignment to the ash-heap of history. Their stories appeared irrelevant to people in both the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland. They were of little interest to Irish republicans, who despised the British Empire, and, with the demise of formal empire after the Second World War, they became increasingly irrelevant to the political outlook of Unionists as well. Historians, with a few pioneering exceptions, shared the same disinterest in the subject of Irish imperial servants. That is no longer the case, as both Imperial and Irish historians have considerably expanded their fields of inquiry in order to interrogate the relationship of the peoples of Ireland, Wales and Scotland to the British Empire. As Barry Crosbie observes in his outstanding recent monograph, Irish Imperial Networks: Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in NineteenthCentury India (2012), this has implications not only for the history and historiography of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Britain and the World Edinburgh University Press

Irish Imperial Networks: Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century India Barry Crosbie. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 301 pp., £60 (hardback)

Britain and the World , Volume 6 (2): 258 – Sep 1, 2013

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Round-Tables; History
ISSN
2043-8567
eISSN
2043-8575
DOI
10.3366/brw.2013.0099
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Britain and the World 6.2 (2013): 258­275 DOI: 10.3366/brw.2013.0099 # Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/brw Print ISSN: 2043-8567; online ISSN: 2043-8575 Round-Table Irish Imperial Networks: Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century India Barry Crosbie. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 301 pp., £60 (hardback) Irish people who served the British Empire until recently seemed doomed to consignment to the ash-heap of history. Their stories appeared irrelevant to people in both the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland. They were of little interest to Irish republicans, who despised the British Empire, and, with the demise of formal empire after the Second World War, they became increasingly irrelevant to the political outlook of Unionists as well. Historians, with a few pioneering exceptions, shared the same disinterest in the subject of Irish imperial servants. That is no longer the case, as both Imperial and Irish historians have considerably expanded their fields of inquiry in order to interrogate the relationship of the peoples of Ireland, Wales and Scotland to the British Empire. As Barry Crosbie observes in his outstanding recent monograph, Irish Imperial Networks: Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in NineteenthCentury India (2012), this has implications not only for the history and historiography of

Journal

Britain and the WorldEdinburgh University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2013

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