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Introduction: Sir William Bruce and Architecture in Early Modern Scotland

Introduction: Sir William Bruce and Architecture in Early Modern Scotland accounts of Bruce exist ­ one by John Lowrey in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004), the other by Howard Colvin in his Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600­1840 (4th edn, 2008). There seems no purpose in duplicating that material here, but it may be helpful to highlight here at the outset some key aspects of Bruce's life and architectural career. Life and Career Recent research by Charles Wemyss into Bruce's activities during the 1650s, when Scotland was in enforced union with England, shows Bruce had an eventful life abroad before the restoration of royal power in 1660: as a successful European businessman, living at La Rochelle and then Rotterdam, where family connections enabled him to establish contacts he was later to exploit in his architectural career, for example when materials and expertise needed to be imported for reconstructing Holyroodhouse.1 In the 1660s, Bruce won the patronage as an architect or architectural adviser to some of the most ambitious builders of `Restoration' Scotland.2 In 1671, on the recommendation of the Duke of Lauderdale, Bruce gained the patronage of King Charles II who appointed him royal Surveyor. This meant Bruce was the direct counterpart both to the `old' http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: Sir William Bruce and Architecture in Early Modern Scotland

Architectural Heritage , Volume 23 (1): 1 – Nov 1, 2012

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2012
Subject
Background; Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2012.0030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

accounts of Bruce exist ­ one by John Lowrey in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004), the other by Howard Colvin in his Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600­1840 (4th edn, 2008). There seems no purpose in duplicating that material here, but it may be helpful to highlight here at the outset some key aspects of Bruce's life and architectural career. Life and Career Recent research by Charles Wemyss into Bruce's activities during the 1650s, when Scotland was in enforced union with England, shows Bruce had an eventful life abroad before the restoration of royal power in 1660: as a successful European businessman, living at La Rochelle and then Rotterdam, where family connections enabled him to establish contacts he was later to exploit in his architectural career, for example when materials and expertise needed to be imported for reconstructing Holyroodhouse.1 In the 1660s, Bruce won the patronage as an architect or architectural adviser to some of the most ambitious builders of `Restoration' Scotland.2 In 1671, on the recommendation of the Duke of Lauderdale, Bruce gained the patronage of King Charles II who appointed him royal Surveyor. This meant Bruce was the direct counterpart both to the `old'

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2012

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