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Introduction: Refrains of Freedom

Introduction: Refrains of Freedom Constantin V. Boundas Trent University Panagiotis Sotiris National and Kapodistrian University of Athens `We need both creativity and a people': this is how Gilles Deleuze chose to end the interview he gave to Antonio Negri for Futur Antérieur. If `creativity' refers to the immanent potentiality for collective, productive and affective practices, the notion of the people, in the `minoritarian' sense of it that Deleuze has in mind, brings us back to collective political subjects and politics as a struggle between competing hegemonic projects. Consequently, every attempt to think, from a political point of view, the work of Deleuze and Guattari must avoid simplified oppositions ­ between organised intervention and nomadic action, hegemonic politics and minority assemblages, and revolutionary projects and `lines of escape'. We must rethink the pertinence of Deleuze and Guattari for the contemporary social and political landscape. The crisis of `actually existing neoliberalism' that erupted in 2007­8 has not only been a crisis of finance but rather a crisis of an entire regime of accumulation and social regulation ­ in what Deleuze called societies of control ­ shaking up the belief in the self-regulatory ability of markets and the disciplinary forms of the subjectification they induced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Deleuze Studies Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: Refrains of Freedom

Deleuze Studies , Volume 10 (3): 281 – Aug 1, 2016

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Philosophy and Religion
ISSN
1750-2241
eISSN
1755-1684
DOI
10.3366/dls.2016.0226
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Constantin V. Boundas Trent University Panagiotis Sotiris National and Kapodistrian University of Athens `We need both creativity and a people': this is how Gilles Deleuze chose to end the interview he gave to Antonio Negri for Futur Antérieur. If `creativity' refers to the immanent potentiality for collective, productive and affective practices, the notion of the people, in the `minoritarian' sense of it that Deleuze has in mind, brings us back to collective political subjects and politics as a struggle between competing hegemonic projects. Consequently, every attempt to think, from a political point of view, the work of Deleuze and Guattari must avoid simplified oppositions ­ between organised intervention and nomadic action, hegemonic politics and minority assemblages, and revolutionary projects and `lines of escape'. We must rethink the pertinence of Deleuze and Guattari for the contemporary social and political landscape. The crisis of `actually existing neoliberalism' that erupted in 2007­8 has not only been a crisis of finance but rather a crisis of an entire regime of accumulation and social regulation ­ in what Deleuze called societies of control ­ shaking up the belief in the self-regulatory ability of markets and the disciplinary forms of the subjectification they induced.

Journal

Deleuze StudiesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2016

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