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Introduction: Modernism's Collaborative Poetics

Introduction: Modernism's Collaborative Poetics Introduction: Modernism’s Collaborative Poetics Alex Runchman and Tom Walker In an appreciation first published in one of his ‘London Letters’ to the American magazine The Dial in late 1922, and then reprinted the following year in his own London-based Criterion,T.S.Eliot commemorates the recently deceased music hall artist Marie Lloyd. He notes that Lloyd’s audiences ‘were invariably sympathetic, and it was through this sympathy that she controlled them’. But while he anticipates that the transatlantic audience of his letter will be sympathetic to Lloyd, since she had performed with success in the United States too, Eliot admits he could not imagine her separated from the local audiences that he saw as an integral part of her act: ‘she was only seen at her best under the stimulus of those audiences in England, and especially in Cockney London, who had crowded to hear her for thirty years’. What most seems to appeal to Eliot is Lloyd’s reciprocal relationship with these audiences, the way in which she allowed them to co-create her performance. ‘The working man who went to the music-hall and saw Marie Lloyd and joined in the chorus was himself performing part of the act’, Eliot remarks, and thus engaging http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: Modernism's Collaborative Poetics

Modernist Cultures , Volume 14 (1): 16 – Feb 1, 2019

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2019.0237
Publisher site
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Abstract

Introduction: Modernism’s Collaborative Poetics Alex Runchman and Tom Walker In an appreciation first published in one of his ‘London Letters’ to the American magazine The Dial in late 1922, and then reprinted the following year in his own London-based Criterion,T.S.Eliot commemorates the recently deceased music hall artist Marie Lloyd. He notes that Lloyd’s audiences ‘were invariably sympathetic, and it was through this sympathy that she controlled them’. But while he anticipates that the transatlantic audience of his letter will be sympathetic to Lloyd, since she had performed with success in the United States too, Eliot admits he could not imagine her separated from the local audiences that he saw as an integral part of her act: ‘she was only seen at her best under the stimulus of those audiences in England, and especially in Cockney London, who had crowded to hear her for thirty years’. What most seems to appeal to Eliot is Lloyd’s reciprocal relationship with these audiences, the way in which she allowed them to co-create her performance. ‘The working man who went to the music-hall and saw Marie Lloyd and joined in the chorus was himself performing part of the act’, Eliot remarks, and thus engaging

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2019

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