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Introduction: Modernism in Public

Introduction: Modernism in Public Rod Rosenquist and Alice Wood In Greenwich Village between 1915 and 1916, Guido Bruno ­ publisher of work by Djuna Barnes, Alfred Kreymborg, and Marianne Moore as well as one of the first exhibitors of Clara Tice ­ regularly opened his artist's `garret' on Washington Square to the public. `After paying 10 or 25 cents, depending on how business had been going, the sightseers entered a cluttered suite of rooms and beheld a dozen or more "struggling artists'': bearded young men contemplating half-finished paintings'.1 The very notion of the artist's garret, conveying a sense of private aesthetic contemplation or labour ­ Bruno appropriated the term because he `rather liked the intimacy of it' ­ had become a tourist destination, a newly public space providing him with an income. His memories of this cultural space are, in the end, not framed in terms of privacy and intimacy, but in terms of the masses, describing how within a year `correspondence was brought in big mail bags [and] the sight-seeing busses stopped in front of my old little frame building'.2 Just as the public were allowed `in' (for a fee), modernist artists were at the same time regularly getting `out' into http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: Modernism in Public

Modernist Cultures , Volume 11 (3): 299 – Nov 1, 2016

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2016
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2016.0142
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rod Rosenquist and Alice Wood In Greenwich Village between 1915 and 1916, Guido Bruno ­ publisher of work by Djuna Barnes, Alfred Kreymborg, and Marianne Moore as well as one of the first exhibitors of Clara Tice ­ regularly opened his artist's `garret' on Washington Square to the public. `After paying 10 or 25 cents, depending on how business had been going, the sightseers entered a cluttered suite of rooms and beheld a dozen or more "struggling artists'': bearded young men contemplating half-finished paintings'.1 The very notion of the artist's garret, conveying a sense of private aesthetic contemplation or labour ­ Bruno appropriated the term because he `rather liked the intimacy of it' ­ had become a tourist destination, a newly public space providing him with an income. His memories of this cultural space are, in the end, not framed in terms of privacy and intimacy, but in terms of the masses, describing how within a year `correspondence was brought in big mail bags [and] the sight-seeing busses stopped in front of my old little frame building'.2 Just as the public were allowed `in' (for a fee), modernist artists were at the same time regularly getting `out' into

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2016

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