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Introduction: Modernism and the First World War

Introduction: Modernism and the First World War Andrew Frayn Since the centenary of the declaration of the First World War in August 2014, there has been a renewed focus on its meaning in the twenty-first century. The initial response in 2014 was characterized by reconsiderations of the war as a whole, from the academic to the popular. Notable among these was the BBC's Jeremy Paxman-fronted Britain's Great War (2014), which did a commendable job within the confines of four hours of primetime television. Recent years have seen prominent commemorations of notable battles and campaigns such as Gallipoli and Jutland; the rules of engagement, to borrow a military metaphor, continue to be broadened.1 This ground is fought over once more in interpretative terms, and the discussion shows little sign of abating. Combatant nations were affected irrevocably by the First World War. Political institutions and national boundaries changed for many; in all cases the social fabric was altered profoundly. The war played a key role in hastening the decline of empire, from Dublin to Delhi, and the expansion of the franchise by gender, age and (lack of) financial qualification promised a more democratic nation. The cultural impact resonated widely and continues to echo, from the disillusioned works http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: Modernism and the First World War

Modernist Cultures , Volume 12 (1): 1 – Mar 1, 2017

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2017
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2017.0153
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Andrew Frayn Since the centenary of the declaration of the First World War in August 2014, there has been a renewed focus on its meaning in the twenty-first century. The initial response in 2014 was characterized by reconsiderations of the war as a whole, from the academic to the popular. Notable among these was the BBC's Jeremy Paxman-fronted Britain's Great War (2014), which did a commendable job within the confines of four hours of primetime television. Recent years have seen prominent commemorations of notable battles and campaigns such as Gallipoli and Jutland; the rules of engagement, to borrow a military metaphor, continue to be broadened.1 This ground is fought over once more in interpretative terms, and the discussion shows little sign of abating. Combatant nations were affected irrevocably by the First World War. Political institutions and national boundaries changed for many; in all cases the social fabric was altered profoundly. The war played a key role in hastening the decline of empire, from Dublin to Delhi, and the expansion of the franchise by gender, age and (lack of) financial qualification promised a more democratic nation. The cultural impact resonated widely and continues to echo, from the disillusioned works

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2017

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