Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction: Modernism and the Environment

Introduction: Modernism and the Environment Modernism and the Environment Jeremy Diaper Modernism has historically been considered an urban movement and the locations of London, Paris, Vienna, Berlin and New York feature prominently in previous accounts. It was in these constantly evolving cities that the figureheads of modernism were able to sustain and develop their literary and aesthetic ideas through artistic networks facilitated by salons, literary patrons, little magazines and small presses. From the setting of London in Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway and Conrad’s The Secret Agent, to the Dublin streets and neighbourhoods in Joyce’s Ulysses, the seminal modernist texts are themselves embedded within the locale of the metropolitan city and it is this urban environment which has frequently shaped the scholarly approaches towards the field of modernist studies. Indeed, whilst scholars have attentively observed the nuances in the modernist perspective of the city and the plurality of responses towards it, interpretations of modernism have frequently remained inseparable from the metropolitan city and urban setting. As Malcolm Bradbury succinctly puts it, modernism was ‘an art of cities,’ which has consequently been categorized by its ‘urban climates, and the ideas and campaigns, the new philosophies and politics that ran through them.’ A number of the seminal studies http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: Modernism and the Environment

Modernist Cultures , Volume 16 (1): 11 – Feb 1, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/introduction-modernism-and-the-environment-q0aX2dXpj0
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2021.0317
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Modernism and the Environment Jeremy Diaper Modernism has historically been considered an urban movement and the locations of London, Paris, Vienna, Berlin and New York feature prominently in previous accounts. It was in these constantly evolving cities that the figureheads of modernism were able to sustain and develop their literary and aesthetic ideas through artistic networks facilitated by salons, literary patrons, little magazines and small presses. From the setting of London in Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway and Conrad’s The Secret Agent, to the Dublin streets and neighbourhoods in Joyce’s Ulysses, the seminal modernist texts are themselves embedded within the locale of the metropolitan city and it is this urban environment which has frequently shaped the scholarly approaches towards the field of modernist studies. Indeed, whilst scholars have attentively observed the nuances in the modernist perspective of the city and the plurality of responses towards it, interpretations of modernism have frequently remained inseparable from the metropolitan city and urban setting. As Malcolm Bradbury succinctly puts it, modernism was ‘an art of cities,’ which has consequently been categorized by its ‘urban climates, and the ideas and campaigns, the new philosophies and politics that ran through them.’ A number of the seminal studies

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2021

There are no references for this article.