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Introduction: Modernism and Dance

Introduction: Modernism and Dance Carrie J. Preston The Parisian audience famously rioted when Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes premiered Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées on May 29, 1913. Sacre represents an international convergence of modernist art, with choreography by Vaslav Nijinsky, designs and scenario by Nicholas Roerich, and music by Igor Stravinsky. One hundred years later, Sacre's choreography of vernal consecration and sacrifice, its invocation of a pre-Christian Slavic past, and the music's polyrhythmic energy continue to vibrate in dance performance and throughout this issue of . In spite of Sacre's influence, the interdisciplinary innovation and artistic ferment that produced this and other remarkable dance performances have not been sufficiently explored ­ one symptom of the lack of exchange between modernist studies and dance studies even as both have flourished simultaneously in the past two decades. This special issue on `Modernism and Dance' uses the centennial of Sacre as an occasion to encourage that conversation. By bringing into focus the often uncomfortable positions of dance in relation to , this issue presents a flexible, mobile, rather messy version of modernism. Definitions of modernism must stretch to accommodate dance, as dance highlights early twentiethcentury preoccupations with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: Modernism and Dance

Modernist Cultures , Volume 9 (1): 1 – May 1, 2014

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2014
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2014.0070
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Carrie J. Preston The Parisian audience famously rioted when Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes premiered Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées on May 29, 1913. Sacre represents an international convergence of modernist art, with choreography by Vaslav Nijinsky, designs and scenario by Nicholas Roerich, and music by Igor Stravinsky. One hundred years later, Sacre's choreography of vernal consecration and sacrifice, its invocation of a pre-Christian Slavic past, and the music's polyrhythmic energy continue to vibrate in dance performance and throughout this issue of . In spite of Sacre's influence, the interdisciplinary innovation and artistic ferment that produced this and other remarkable dance performances have not been sufficiently explored ­ one symptom of the lack of exchange between modernist studies and dance studies even as both have flourished simultaneously in the past two decades. This special issue on `Modernism and Dance' uses the centennial of Sacre as an occasion to encourage that conversation. By bringing into focus the often uncomfortable positions of dance in relation to , this issue presents a flexible, mobile, rather messy version of modernism. Definitions of modernism must stretch to accommodate dance, as dance highlights early twentiethcentury preoccupations with

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2014

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