Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction: How ‘Modernist’ Were Hispanic Literary and Artistic Modernities?

Introduction: How ‘Modernist’ Were Hispanic Literary and Artistic Modernities? José María Rodríguez García The rubric ‘Hispanic literary and artistic modernities’ covers geographically a wide range of linguistic and cultural expression. It refers most immediately to literatures written in Spanish and other Iberian romance languages between the last third of the nineteenth century and the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War and the nearsimultaneous attempts by some strong Latin American governments to nationalise and diversify cultural production at the same time. The best instance of these attempts at accelerated (inter)nationalisation may well be the Mexico of Lázaro Cárdenas (1934–40), known for the consecration of Diego Rivera’s murals as Mexico’s national art (the artist worked at the Palacio Nacional in 1929–35) and for warmly welcoming Leon Trotsky as a refugee, Antonin Artaud as a resident, André Breton as a visitor, and a large number of progressive intellectuals and artists as exiles from Civil War Spain. Yet few critics, either within Hispanism or in related fields, have used the term ‘modernism’ to designate the literary and visual production from the territorial expanse and the period I have just marked out. Fewer still have conceded that Hispanic cultures may be peripheral to Englishlanguage letters at the same time that they have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: How ‘Modernist’ Were Hispanic Literary and Artistic Modernities?

Modernist Cultures , Volume 7 (1): 1 – May 1, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/introduction-how-modernist-were-hispanic-literary-and-artistic-lGsNL4oqss
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2012
Subject
Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2012.0025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

José María Rodríguez García The rubric ‘Hispanic literary and artistic modernities’ covers geographically a wide range of linguistic and cultural expression. It refers most immediately to literatures written in Spanish and other Iberian romance languages between the last third of the nineteenth century and the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War and the nearsimultaneous attempts by some strong Latin American governments to nationalise and diversify cultural production at the same time. The best instance of these attempts at accelerated (inter)nationalisation may well be the Mexico of Lázaro Cárdenas (1934–40), known for the consecration of Diego Rivera’s murals as Mexico’s national art (the artist worked at the Palacio Nacional in 1929–35) and for warmly welcoming Leon Trotsky as a refugee, Antonin Artaud as a resident, André Breton as a visitor, and a large number of progressive intellectuals and artists as exiles from Civil War Spain. Yet few critics, either within Hispanism or in related fields, have used the term ‘modernism’ to designate the literary and visual production from the territorial expanse and the period I have just marked out. Fewer still have conceded that Hispanic cultures may be peripheral to Englishlanguage letters at the same time that they have

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.