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Introduction: Ex-centric Modernisms

Introduction: Ex-centric Modernisms Matthew Creasy and Alex Thomson [W]e find ourselves in the moment of transit where space and time cross to produce complex figures of difference and identity, past and present, inside and outside, inclusion and exclusion. Homi Bhabha, The Location of Culture (London: Routledge, 1994) Homi Bhabba's assertion from 1994 seems to have been borne out by subsequent developments within modernist studies. The spatial and chronological boundaries of those studies have been pushed to bursting point, and the two categories also intertwine in ever more complex ways. Bhabha points to the inextricable political dimension of our thinking about the relationship between space and time. Raised explicitly and repeatedly in both modernist art and its subsequent criticism, this may be one of the reasons for the continued currency of a term such as modernism, which had once seemed to be outmoded in the demand that we get beyond or `post' modernism. Under the heading `Ex-centric Modernisms' this special issue brings together a range of essays, all of which use comparative perspectives to explore these crossings of time, space, and inclusion. Modernist studies have long connected aesthetic invention with geographical displacement, representing a specific group of European cities as the crucibles http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: Ex-centric Modernisms

Modernist Cultures , Volume 8 (2): 157 – Oct 1, 2013

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2013
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2013.0058
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Matthew Creasy and Alex Thomson [W]e find ourselves in the moment of transit where space and time cross to produce complex figures of difference and identity, past and present, inside and outside, inclusion and exclusion. Homi Bhabha, The Location of Culture (London: Routledge, 1994) Homi Bhabba's assertion from 1994 seems to have been borne out by subsequent developments within modernist studies. The spatial and chronological boundaries of those studies have been pushed to bursting point, and the two categories also intertwine in ever more complex ways. Bhabha points to the inextricable political dimension of our thinking about the relationship between space and time. Raised explicitly and repeatedly in both modernist art and its subsequent criticism, this may be one of the reasons for the continued currency of a term such as modernism, which had once seemed to be outmoded in the demand that we get beyond or `post' modernism. Under the heading `Ex-centric Modernisms' this special issue brings together a range of essays, all of which use comparative perspectives to explore these crossings of time, space, and inclusion. Modernist studies have long connected aesthetic invention with geographical displacement, representing a specific group of European cities as the crucibles

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2013

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