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Introduction

Introduction i.i Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812—i8j2) painted in 184c by J. r. Herbert. The pair of dividers which Pugin is holding was given to him in 1 830 by James Gillespie Graham, after Graham had helped the young man following a shipwreck at Leith. painted in 84c by J. R. Herbert, which hangs in Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (18 1 2— 1 8 c 2) is depicted holding a pair of dividers (Figure 1.1). This instrument both indicates his profession as an architect and also refers to an intriguing part of the Pugin legend, for it was given to him in 830 by the Scottish architect, James Gillespie Graham, after Graham had helped the young man following a shipwreck at Leith. Pugin visited Scotland a number of times during his subsequent career and assisted Gillespie Graham on several projects. Yet Pugin did not, in fact, design any complete buildings north of the border himself, although it later emerged that he was indirectly responsible for the long-lost Catholic Apostolic church in Glasgow (Figure 1.2), while at least one other building seems to have been based on his published designs.1 Why the Anglo-French Gothicist should have had so little impact http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.1997.8.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

i.i Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812—i8j2) painted in 184c by J. r. Herbert. The pair of dividers which Pugin is holding was given to him in 1 830 by James Gillespie Graham, after Graham had helped the young man following a shipwreck at Leith. painted in 84c by J. R. Herbert, which hangs in Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (18 1 2— 1 8 c 2) is depicted holding a pair of dividers (Figure 1.1). This instrument both indicates his profession as an architect and also refers to an intriguing part of the Pugin legend, for it was given to him in 830 by the Scottish architect, James Gillespie Graham, after Graham had helped the young man following a shipwreck at Leith. Pugin visited Scotland a number of times during his subsequent career and assisted Gillespie Graham on several projects. Yet Pugin did not, in fact, design any complete buildings north of the border himself, although it later emerged that he was indirectly responsible for the long-lost Catholic Apostolic church in Glasgow (Figure 1.2), while at least one other building seems to have been based on his published designs.1 Why the Anglo-French Gothicist should have had so little impact

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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