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Intellectual Property, Agricultural Biotechnology and the Right to Adequate Food: A Critical African Perspective

Intellectual Property, Agricultural Biotechnology and the Right to Adequate Food: A Critical... CHIDI OGUAMANAM I. INTRODUCTION Recent political strife in parts of the Arab Middle East and North Africa are linked, among other things, to food insecurity.1 Historically, food insecurity in these regions has been linked to political instability.2 The success of responsive policy advancements, especially those at the intersections of legal, socio-cultural and technological interventions, in the area of food and agriculture, depends on their ability to transform the food insecurity profile of vulnerable regions and segments of the world's population. Such an outcome contributes significantly to national and international political stability. Issues of equity and access, as complements of sound legal regulatory and policy responses are critical in harnessing the technological transformations in the areas of agriculture and food production. Even though the harmful consequences of food insecurity are felt at a national level, they are, in part, the effects of decisions made at global levels.3 Clearly, national policies are crucial for sustainable agriculture. However, with unprecedented trade liberalisation, extreme globalisation, and severe distortions in global food systems, global strategies have become increasingly important.4 Less developed countries, especially those in Africa, are buffeted by a complex combination of factors in their bid to cash the promises and fulfil http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

Intellectual Property, Agricultural Biotechnology and the Right to Adequate Food: A Critical African Perspective

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2015
Subject
Articles; African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2015.0133
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHIDI OGUAMANAM I. INTRODUCTION Recent political strife in parts of the Arab Middle East and North Africa are linked, among other things, to food insecurity.1 Historically, food insecurity in these regions has been linked to political instability.2 The success of responsive policy advancements, especially those at the intersections of legal, socio-cultural and technological interventions, in the area of food and agriculture, depends on their ability to transform the food insecurity profile of vulnerable regions and segments of the world's population. Such an outcome contributes significantly to national and international political stability. Issues of equity and access, as complements of sound legal regulatory and policy responses are critical in harnessing the technological transformations in the areas of agriculture and food production. Even though the harmful consequences of food insecurity are felt at a national level, they are, in part, the effects of decisions made at global levels.3 Clearly, national policies are crucial for sustainable agriculture. However, with unprecedented trade liberalisation, extreme globalisation, and severe distortions in global food systems, global strategies have become increasingly important.4 Less developed countries, especially those in Africa, are buffeted by a complex combination of factors in their bid to cash the promises and fulfil

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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