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‘Influence poetry once more’: Allen Tate and Milton's ‘Lycidas’

‘Influence poetry once more’: Allen Tate and Milton's ‘Lycidas’ The standard narrative of the Milton Controversy in the early twentieth century has frequently regarded the New Criticism as part of the modernist antipathy towards Milton, which was fostered by articles such as F. R. Leavis's ‘Milton's Verse’ (1933) and T. S. Eliot's ‘A Note on the Verse of John Milton’ (1935). This essay challenges such depictions of two prominent New Critics – Allen Tate and John Crowe Ransom – as inveterately hostile to Milton, arguing instead that he occupies a significant place in their poetry and criticism. By also considering these American writers’ debts to Milton as a context in which to situate the early work of a British poet deeply influenced by them, Geoffrey Hill, the essay opens up new perspectives on Milton's transatlantic reception in the mid-century and his importance to modernist poetics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

‘Influence poetry once more’: Allen Tate and Milton's ‘Lycidas’

Modernist Cultures , Volume 14 (2): 20 – May 1, 2019

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2019.0250
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The standard narrative of the Milton Controversy in the early twentieth century has frequently regarded the New Criticism as part of the modernist antipathy towards Milton, which was fostered by articles such as F. R. Leavis's ‘Milton's Verse’ (1933) and T. S. Eliot's ‘A Note on the Verse of John Milton’ (1935). This essay challenges such depictions of two prominent New Critics – Allen Tate and John Crowe Ransom – as inveterately hostile to Milton, arguing instead that he occupies a significant place in their poetry and criticism. By also considering these American writers’ debts to Milton as a context in which to situate the early work of a British poet deeply influenced by them, Geoffrey Hill, the essay opens up new perspectives on Milton's transatlantic reception in the mid-century and his importance to modernist poetics.

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2019

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