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In Memory of Bob Morris

In Memory of Bob Morris International Review of Scottish Studies 48.1 (2023): 16 DOI: 10.3366/irss.2023.0007 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/irss Rachel Nordstrom Historians, authors, and researchers study the historical impact of photography on all realms of everyday life; they reveal how we understand the world around us and how we view ourselves. What Bob Morris brought to such projects went beyond an academic analysis of photographic mediums and formats. Morris’s writings on the importance of the photographic postcard and J. Valentine & Sons of Dundee are deeply insightful but also accessible for a wider audience beyond academia. Scotland is an endless plane of photogenic landscapes, quaint villages, monumental structures, and bustling cities. Equally vibrant and diverse are the people and cultures who live there. It is no wonder that by the turn of the twentieth century, Scotland was home to many of the earliest photographers and some of the largest photographic publishing firms in the world. The rise of one of the largest of these firms, J. Valentine & Sons, is thoroughly examined in Morris’s 2007 book Scotland 1907: The Many Scotland’s of Valentine and Sons Photographers. As the Photographic Collections Manager at the University of St Andrews, where the Valentine Collection is held, I have been working extensively with their prints, postcards, and ephemera for nearly ten years. Bob Morris’s book was, rightly so, on our office research shelf—an invaluable reference for research requests and a resource that helps guide our own general collections management tasks. Bob Morris’s insights into the social and cultural impact of the photographic postcard in preparation for Sincerely Valentine—From Postcards to Greeting Cards at the V&A Dundee. It was a pleasure to delve into Morris’s research, and this medium of our past was so central to social communications. The loss of Professor R. J. Morris this past autumn brings sadness to many. I, for one, find some comfort in the intellectual legacy he leaves to researchers, historians, readers, and inquisitive minds for generations to come. RACHEL NORDSTROM, Former Photographic Collections Manager, University of St Andrews. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Review of Scottish Studies Edinburgh University Press

In Memory of Bob Morris

International Review of Scottish Studies , Volume 48 (1): 1 – Jun 1, 2023

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1923-5755
eISSN
1923-5763
DOI
10.3366/irss.2023.0007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International Review of Scottish Studies 48.1 (2023): 16 DOI: 10.3366/irss.2023.0007 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/irss Rachel Nordstrom Historians, authors, and researchers study the historical impact of photography on all realms of everyday life; they reveal how we understand the world around us and how we view ourselves. What Bob Morris brought to such projects went beyond an academic analysis of photographic mediums and formats. Morris’s writings on the importance of the photographic postcard and J. Valentine & Sons of Dundee are deeply insightful but also accessible for a wider audience beyond academia. Scotland is an endless plane of photogenic landscapes, quaint villages, monumental structures, and bustling cities. Equally vibrant and diverse are the people and cultures who live there. It is no wonder that by the turn of the twentieth century, Scotland was home to many of the earliest photographers and some of the largest photographic publishing firms in the world. The rise of one of the largest of these firms, J. Valentine & Sons, is thoroughly examined in Morris’s 2007 book Scotland 1907: The Many Scotland’s of Valentine and Sons Photographers. As the Photographic Collections Manager at the University of St Andrews, where the Valentine Collection is held, I have been working extensively with their prints, postcards, and ephemera for nearly ten years. Bob Morris’s book was, rightly so, on our office research shelf—an invaluable reference for research requests and a resource that helps guide our own general collections management tasks. Bob Morris’s insights into the social and cultural impact of the photographic postcard in preparation for Sincerely Valentine—From Postcards to Greeting Cards at the V&A Dundee. It was a pleasure to delve into Morris’s research, and this medium of our past was so central to social communications. The loss of Professor R. J. Morris this past autumn brings sadness to many. I, for one, find some comfort in the intellectual legacy he leaves to researchers, historians, readers, and inquisitive minds for generations to come. RACHEL NORDSTROM, Former Photographic Collections Manager, University of St Andrews.

Journal

International Review of Scottish StudiesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2023

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