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In Memoriam

In Memoriam Mark Dilworth, OSB, M.A., Ph.D. Gerard Mark Dilworth, who died on Saturday 28 February 2004, was born in Edinburgh on 4 April 1924, the son of Henry Dilworth and his wife, Rose. His friendly disposition to people of other faiths made him acceptable among many Scots historians. He was described by one of them as "ecumenically friendly". He was professed as a monk of Fort Augustus abbey, a Benedictine school by the shores of Loch Ness, on 6 October 1942, ordained priest in September 1947 and served as parish priest of Fort Augustus from 1974 to 1979. He was well known to visitors to the north, especially as abbot from 1991. In 1969 he won the Hume Brown Senior Prize in Scottish History and the Royal Historical Society's David Berry prize in 1986. His numerous historical publications include The Scots in Franconia (1974), George Douglas, priest and martyr (1987); Whithorn Priory in the late Middle Ages (1994) and Scottish Monasteries in the late Middle Ages (1995). He was regarded as something of a linguist in several European languages and took a particular interest in Gaelic, a gift that entitled him to the post of senior modern languages master at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2004.34.1.3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mark Dilworth, OSB, M.A., Ph.D. Gerard Mark Dilworth, who died on Saturday 28 February 2004, was born in Edinburgh on 4 April 1924, the son of Henry Dilworth and his wife, Rose. His friendly disposition to people of other faiths made him acceptable among many Scots historians. He was described by one of them as "ecumenically friendly". He was professed as a monk of Fort Augustus abbey, a Benedictine school by the shores of Loch Ness, on 6 October 1942, ordained priest in September 1947 and served as parish priest of Fort Augustus from 1974 to 1979. He was well known to visitors to the north, especially as abbot from 1991. In 1969 he won the Hume Brown Senior Prize in Scottish History and the Royal Historical Society's David Berry prize in 1986. His numerous historical publications include The Scots in Franconia (1974), George Douglas, priest and martyr (1987); Whithorn Priory in the late Middle Ages (1994) and Scottish Monasteries in the late Middle Ages (1995). He was regarded as something of a linguist in several European languages and took a particular interest in Gaelic, a gift that entitled him to the post of senior modern languages master at

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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