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Improving Access: A Proposal to Create a Database for the Probate Records at the Borthwick Institute

Improving Access: A Proposal to Create a Database for the Probate Records at the Borthwick Institute The Borthwick Institute has the largest collection of probaterecords outside the PRO, consistingofaround 500,000 to 750,000probates. These include therecords ofthe Prerogative Court ofYork, the ExchequerCourt of York, and more than thirty peculiar jurisdictions. The geographical range is huge, while the temporal range is the largest anywhere; the Institute holds the earliest series of registered wills in England and Wales. It also houses some of the earliest and, later on, the best qualityprobate inventories. At present the finding aids are inadequate; there are finding aids of different sorts compiled at different times from the eighteenth century onwards, but such aids as exist are angled towards family historians. There is an urgent need to compile adequate finding aids covering all the probate material (includinginventories) in a way that makes the materials accessible for both family historians and academic researchers. A database was the obvious choice for doing this, andfor a variety ofreasons Paradox for Windows was chosen for a pilot project. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

Improving Access: A Proposal to Create a Database for the Probate Records at the Borthwick Institute

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/hac.1995.7.3.152
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Borthwick Institute has the largest collection of probaterecords outside the PRO, consistingofaround 500,000 to 750,000probates. These include therecords ofthe Prerogative Court ofYork, the ExchequerCourt of York, and more than thirty peculiar jurisdictions. The geographical range is huge, while the temporal range is the largest anywhere; the Institute holds the earliest series of registered wills in England and Wales. It also houses some of the earliest and, later on, the best qualityprobate inventories. At present the finding aids are inadequate; there are finding aids of different sorts compiled at different times from the eighteenth century onwards, but such aids as exist are angled towards family historians. There is an urgent need to compile adequate finding aids covering all the probate material (includinginventories) in a way that makes the materials accessible for both family historians and academic researchers. A database was the obvious choice for doing this, andfor a variety ofreasons Paradox for Windows was chosen for a pilot project.

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1995

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