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If you study a word do you use it more often? Lexical repetition priming in a corpus of Natural Semantic Metalanguage publications

If you study a word do you use it more often? Lexical repetition priming in a corpus of Natural... <jats:p> Psycholinguistic and corpus studies have shown that syntactic repetition priming can influence linguistic analyses. The impact of lexical repetition priming on linguistic work, on the other hand, has not been assessed. The current study finds evidence of lexical priming in a corpus of linguistics publications on the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM), in which semantic analyses are written using several dozen ‘semantic primitives’ such as something, know and place. NSM theorists are repeatedly exposed to a small set of words, much like subjects in lexical repetition priming experiments. When all analyses written in NSM are removed from NSM publications, these texts are found to nevertheless include significantly more ‘primitives’ than control publications, suggesting that the study of particular words can affect linguists’ lexical choices. This is potentially problematic for semantic analyses in NSM, which consist of strings of primitives selected by the analysts. These primitives are not considered to be English words, but have the same forms as English words. If priming occurs between the NSM analyses and their English environment, theorists’ exposure to English may impact their choice of primitives and the content of their analyses. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Corpora Edinburgh University Press

If you study a word do you use it more often? Lexical repetition priming in a corpus of Natural Semantic Metalanguage publications

Corpora , Volume 10 (3): 277 – Nov 1, 2015

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References (70)

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Linguistics
ISSN
1749-5032
eISSN
1755-1676
DOI
10.3366/cor.2015.0078
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> Psycholinguistic and corpus studies have shown that syntactic repetition priming can influence linguistic analyses. The impact of lexical repetition priming on linguistic work, on the other hand, has not been assessed. The current study finds evidence of lexical priming in a corpus of linguistics publications on the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM), in which semantic analyses are written using several dozen ‘semantic primitives’ such as something, know and place. NSM theorists are repeatedly exposed to a small set of words, much like subjects in lexical repetition priming experiments. When all analyses written in NSM are removed from NSM publications, these texts are found to nevertheless include significantly more ‘primitives’ than control publications, suggesting that the study of particular words can affect linguists’ lexical choices. This is potentially problematic for semantic analyses in NSM, which consist of strings of primitives selected by the analysts. These primitives are not considered to be English words, but have the same forms as English words. If priming occurs between the NSM analyses and their English environment, theorists’ exposure to English may impact their choice of primitives and the content of their analyses. </jats:p>

Journal

CorporaEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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