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Idealist for Windows 3.0

Idealist for Windows 3.0 Hardware, Software and Courseware This section seeks to keep historians informed about the wide range of computer software and equipment suitable for history research and teaching. Because our audience includes many who have little experience with computers, we try to avoid excessive use ofjargon and include occasional introductory articles. Software reviews focus on features which historians will find useful. Reviews are intended both to reveal the potential ofsoftware and to give readers more torelyon than the promises ofmanufacturers and dealers, thus saving them time andmoney. Readers interested in writing software reviews should write to Donald Spaeth, Technical Reviews Editor, History and Computing. Department ofModern History, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ. E-mail:: DSPAETH @ DISH.GLÄ.ÄC.UK. We also welcome letters and suggestions of items for review. Spencer Jordan The debate surrounding the historian's use of offthe-shelf database management systems (DBMS) such as Paradox is a familiar one.1 Despite their many advantages, historians can feel that the constraints of encapsulating data within a series of small text or number fields make such databases totally inappropriate for much historical data, the limiting structure forcing the historian to simplify irrevocably the original source material. This restructuring naturally ties the final database to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Hardware, Software and Courseware
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/hac.1995.7.3.156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hardware, Software and Courseware This section seeks to keep historians informed about the wide range of computer software and equipment suitable for history research and teaching. Because our audience includes many who have little experience with computers, we try to avoid excessive use ofjargon and include occasional introductory articles. Software reviews focus on features which historians will find useful. Reviews are intended both to reveal the potential ofsoftware and to give readers more torelyon than the promises ofmanufacturers and dealers, thus saving them time andmoney. Readers interested in writing software reviews should write to Donald Spaeth, Technical Reviews Editor, History and Computing. Department ofModern History, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ. E-mail:: DSPAETH @ DISH.GLÄ.ÄC.UK. We also welcome letters and suggestions of items for review. Spencer Jordan The debate surrounding the historian's use of offthe-shelf database management systems (DBMS) such as Paradox is a familiar one.1 Despite their many advantages, historians can feel that the constraints of encapsulating data within a series of small text or number fields make such databases totally inappropriate for much historical data, the limiting structure forcing the historian to simplify irrevocably the original source material. This restructuring naturally ties the final database to

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1995

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