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Hidden from history? Piecing together the working lives of ministers wives and daughters 17001750

Hidden from history? Piecing together the working lives of ministers wives and daughters 17001750 Hidden from history? Piecing together the working lives of ministers' wives and daughters 1700-1750 ELIZABETH C. SANDERSON, B.A., Ph.D. A writer of women's history asks, "what is it about middle-class women in the early-modern period that no one wishes to reveal, where are all the clergymen's wives and the daughters of lawyers and doctors?"1 This paper aims, in part at least, to answer this question by looking at the lives of middle-class women, in particular the families of clergymen, who were either working outside the home or were being paid for non-domestic work. The focus on Edinburgh is largely because this study is part of a larger study of middle-class women who were in business in the capital in the eighteenth century.2 It must be emphasised however that all the women to be discussed were self-employed, they were not working for others. In order to appreciate the significance of the fact that ministers ' families can be found working outside the home in the eighteenth century it is necessary to look briefly at the situation of middle-class women in the nineteenth century. Much has been written on this subject and the discussion has centred on the concept of public/private, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

Hidden from history? Piecing together the working lives of ministers wives and daughters 17001750

Scottish Church History , Volume 34 (1): 20 – Jun 1, 2004

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2004.34.1.5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hidden from history? Piecing together the working lives of ministers' wives and daughters 1700-1750 ELIZABETH C. SANDERSON, B.A., Ph.D. A writer of women's history asks, "what is it about middle-class women in the early-modern period that no one wishes to reveal, where are all the clergymen's wives and the daughters of lawyers and doctors?"1 This paper aims, in part at least, to answer this question by looking at the lives of middle-class women, in particular the families of clergymen, who were either working outside the home or were being paid for non-domestic work. The focus on Edinburgh is largely because this study is part of a larger study of middle-class women who were in business in the capital in the eighteenth century.2 It must be emphasised however that all the women to be discussed were self-employed, they were not working for others. In order to appreciate the significance of the fact that ministers ' families can be found working outside the home in the eighteenth century it is necessary to look briefly at the situation of middle-class women in the nineteenth century. Much has been written on this subject and the discussion has centred on the concept of public/private,

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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