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Harland & Wolff in Ireland and Scotland: a comparison of building styles

Harland & Wolff in Ireland and Scotland: a comparison of building styles The firm of Harland & Wolff, which recently ceased operations at its Queen's Island Yard, Belfast, was for many years in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the largest shipbuilding concern in the world. The Belfast yard was the main centre of its operations throughout its life, but in the early twentieth century it seriously considered moving to the Clyde, and acquired yards in Glasgow, Greenock, Dum-barton and Irvine, and built its main foundry, and a large marine diesel engine works, in Glasgow. It also built works in Liverpool, Southampton, and on the Thames at North Woolwich, mainly for ship repair. The firm's buildings were on a scale appropriate to its operations, and unlike many such firms some of its buildings transcended the purely functional, and can be considered as distinctive architectural expression. This paper is concerned with the most distinctive buildings constructed by the firm between the late 1870s and the beginning of the Second World War, in Belfast and on the Clyde. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Harland & Wolff in Ireland and Scotland: a comparison of building styles

Architectural Heritage , Volume 15 (1): 61 – Nov 1, 2004

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2004.15.1.61
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The firm of Harland & Wolff, which recently ceased operations at its Queen's Island Yard, Belfast, was for many years in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the largest shipbuilding concern in the world. The Belfast yard was the main centre of its operations throughout its life, but in the early twentieth century it seriously considered moving to the Clyde, and acquired yards in Glasgow, Greenock, Dum-barton and Irvine, and built its main foundry, and a large marine diesel engine works, in Glasgow. It also built works in Liverpool, Southampton, and on the Thames at North Woolwich, mainly for ship repair. The firm's buildings were on a scale appropriate to its operations, and unlike many such firms some of its buildings transcended the purely functional, and can be considered as distinctive architectural expression. This paper is concerned with the most distinctive buildings constructed by the firm between the late 1870s and the beginning of the Second World War, in Belfast and on the Clyde.

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2004

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