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Guest Editor's Introduction: Digital GeoHumanities: Visualizing Geographic Thought

Guest Editor's Introduction: Digital GeoHumanities: Visualizing Geographic Thought DIGITAL GEOHUMANITIES: VISUALIZING GEOGRAPHIC THOUGHT Researchers in the digital humanities have proven to be stalwarts in capturing the energy of the spatial turn that many disciplines have undergone over the past 20 to 25 years.1 Scholars from the breadth of humanities, including history, literature, classics, and art history, to name some, have looked to spatial representation as a method for forging new questions and revealing new insights from already well-studied documents, as well as from newly created data sets. As a method, spatial representation has been a likely fit within digital humanities, as electronic databases are now more easily than ever transformed into maps, be they interactive or static.2 Practitioners of the spatial turn within the humanities, then, have rightly looked to geography for precedents on building and organizing spatial data, the art of cartographically representing spatial information, as well as the means of interpreting phenomena from a spatial perspective. However, to date the relationship between digital humanities and cultural geography (the most humanistic of the geographical branches) has by and large been a one-way street. That is, the technical arms of cartography and GIS, as well as the interpretive arms of humanistic geography, have been widely welcomed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

Guest Editor's Introduction: Digital GeoHumanities: Visualizing Geographic Thought

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2017
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/ijhac.2017.0174
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DIGITAL GEOHUMANITIES: VISUALIZING GEOGRAPHIC THOUGHT Researchers in the digital humanities have proven to be stalwarts in capturing the energy of the spatial turn that many disciplines have undergone over the past 20 to 25 years.1 Scholars from the breadth of humanities, including history, literature, classics, and art history, to name some, have looked to spatial representation as a method for forging new questions and revealing new insights from already well-studied documents, as well as from newly created data sets. As a method, spatial representation has been a likely fit within digital humanities, as electronic databases are now more easily than ever transformed into maps, be they interactive or static.2 Practitioners of the spatial turn within the humanities, then, have rightly looked to geography for precedents on building and organizing spatial data, the art of cartographically representing spatial information, as well as the means of interpreting phenomena from a spatial perspective. However, to date the relationship between digital humanities and cultural geography (the most humanistic of the geographical branches) has by and large been a one-way street. That is, the technical arms of cartography and GIS, as well as the interpretive arms of humanistic geography, have been widely welcomed

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2017

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