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Glass Slippers vs. Winged Shoes

Glass Slippers vs. Winged Shoes Steven G. Yao and Michael Coyle Thanks for taking on the subject of The Cantos and education and carrying the scholarly conversation forward. As you have shown, it’s a complex topic, and your essay nimbly underscores the importance of education to any sustained consideration of Pound’s accomplishment. We appreciate your contribution to the discussion and offer you both a warm welcome as you step further into the fray. We celebrate, too, your creativity and generosity in making it possible for us to respond directly to your piece. It is, as you have nicely put it, a compelling way to think together. For the most part, we don’t disagree with your characterization of Pound as a not-so-good – even wretched – teacher in The Cantos, one who marshalls and selectively presents evidence in support of his own pre-formed convictions and shifting intuitions. Nor do we dispute your claim that the poem ‘cares much more about who we are (and what we can become) than what we can learn’. However, we would say a little differently that, even more than who we are, the poem cares about how we ACT, about what we DO and DO NOT do. As you observe, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Glass Slippers vs. Winged Shoes

Modernist Cultures , Volume 12 (3): 4 – Nov 1, 2017

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2017.0182
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Steven G. Yao and Michael Coyle Thanks for taking on the subject of The Cantos and education and carrying the scholarly conversation forward. As you have shown, it’s a complex topic, and your essay nimbly underscores the importance of education to any sustained consideration of Pound’s accomplishment. We appreciate your contribution to the discussion and offer you both a warm welcome as you step further into the fray. We celebrate, too, your creativity and generosity in making it possible for us to respond directly to your piece. It is, as you have nicely put it, a compelling way to think together. For the most part, we don’t disagree with your characterization of Pound as a not-so-good – even wretched – teacher in The Cantos, one who marshalls and selectively presents evidence in support of his own pre-formed convictions and shifting intuitions. Nor do we dispute your claim that the poem ‘cares much more about who we are (and what we can become) than what we can learn’. However, we would say a little differently that, even more than who we are, the poem cares about how we ACT, about what we DO and DO NOT do. As you observe,

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2017

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