Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Friction and the Reconfiguration of Colbún's Waterscape: Manoeuvring Across Troubled Waters in the Chilean Central Andes

Friction and the Reconfiguration of Colbún's Waterscape: Manoeuvring Across Troubled Waters in... In the Maule basin, Chile, the domestication of the waters occurs below the line of a thousand meters of altitude, giving rise to the existence of a transition strip which the modernising processes and the elusive practices of mountain populations mutually infiltrate. The strip stands out as a site of confluence of the waters' diverse modes of being, below which stands a waterscape that recreates the environment to naturalise what, in another context, has been the object of dispossession. The Colbún dam and the Panimávida Resort & Spa are iconic of this process in the Maule basin: while erasing all signs of dispossession, these interventions project the image of a narcissistic self-made civilisation. The study of the Colbún area in the Maule basin, central Chile, highlights the multiple historical ways of shaping waterscapes. Water goes through fluctuating conditions depending on how it becomes entangled with social processes. From indigenous daily practices to high-tech engineering, the article suggests the existence of a process of aestheticisation that encompasses the downward movement of the water from the glaciers in the high mountains towards the valleys. Likewise, different epistemologies seem to operate at both sides of the altitudinal divide. This article is both an account of the complex process of statecraft by means of infrastructure, and the overlapped and contested ways such a project imposes ways of framing the material world, more-than-human relationships, time, and urgencies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Somatechnics Edinburgh University Press

Friction and the Reconfiguration of Colbún's Waterscape: Manoeuvring Across Troubled Waters in the Chilean Central Andes

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/friction-and-the-reconfiguration-of-colb-n-s-waterscape-manoeuvring-lGG4i6UIvB

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2044-0138
eISSN
2044-0146
DOI
10.3366/soma.2023.0411
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the Maule basin, Chile, the domestication of the waters occurs below the line of a thousand meters of altitude, giving rise to the existence of a transition strip which the modernising processes and the elusive practices of mountain populations mutually infiltrate. The strip stands out as a site of confluence of the waters' diverse modes of being, below which stands a waterscape that recreates the environment to naturalise what, in another context, has been the object of dispossession. The Colbún dam and the Panimávida Resort & Spa are iconic of this process in the Maule basin: while erasing all signs of dispossession, these interventions project the image of a narcissistic self-made civilisation. The study of the Colbún area in the Maule basin, central Chile, highlights the multiple historical ways of shaping waterscapes. Water goes through fluctuating conditions depending on how it becomes entangled with social processes. From indigenous daily practices to high-tech engineering, the article suggests the existence of a process of aestheticisation that encompasses the downward movement of the water from the glaciers in the high mountains towards the valleys. Likewise, different epistemologies seem to operate at both sides of the altitudinal divide. This article is both an account of the complex process of statecraft by means of infrastructure, and the overlapped and contested ways such a project imposes ways of framing the material world, more-than-human relationships, time, and urgencies.

Journal

SomatechnicsEdinburgh University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2023

There are no references for this article.