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FOREWORD

FOREWORD I am delighted than Historic Scotland is able to sponsor this issue of the Journal of the Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland on Robert Adam and that Ranald Maclnnes, one of our Principal Inspectors of Historic Buildings is a major contributor. Scottish architect whose name is known throughout Great Britain and Adam, although Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the subject of an beyond earlier Journal, cannot now be far behind. The name of Adam is bandied around with about as much imprecision as estate agents reserve for 'Georgian'. Indeed, it has virtually entered the English language alongside such trade names as Hoover and Thermos. 'Adam-style' fireplaces, cornices, door furniture and other derivatives are now stocked in D-I-Y stores alongside the patio doors and double glazing. If the sincerest form of flattery is imitation, then Robert Adam clearly has his place in the Pantheon of household gods. If there is one it is Robert world of difference between being 'known' and being understood and properly appreciated. There are many furth of Scotland who are ignorant of Robert Adam's work north of the border. A guest from southern England in a well-known Scottish house was recently heard to express surprise that Robert Adam had been active but so far north! So much for Charlotte Square, Gosford House, Dumfries House in an easy Scottish smugness about this solecism we should consider before we indulge how much we know about Robert Adam. 'I kent his faither' is the traditional Caledonian put-down for those who have made good, but how many Scots know about William Adam and his works and the context and training he provided for his sons? The essays in the Journal are of value because they cause us to question our assumption that we 'know' Robert Adam simply because we have visited and enjoyed some of the fruits of his genius. We will all have our favourites the libraries at Meilerstain and Kenwood, the functionality of Register House, the monumental qualities of Culzean and Dalquharran and the charm of the garden folly at Auchincruive. Robert Adam is an old friend but it is all too easy to take old friends for granted. Friendships are deepened by critical re-appraisal and a sympathetic seeking for greater understanding. New knowledge needs to be gathered and analysed. We should be grateful to Ian Gow and John Lowrey for commissioning the contributions to this Journal and editing it. But there is .... No-one could say that Robert Adam is a prophet without honour in his own country. On the other hand his message should shine more brightly in the light of these stimulating and thought-provoking essays. GRAEME MUNRO Director and Chief Executive Historic Scotland http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

FOREWORD

Architectural Heritage , Volume 4 (4): I – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.1993.4.4.I
Publisher site
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Abstract

I am delighted than Historic Scotland is able to sponsor this issue of the Journal of the Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland on Robert Adam and that Ranald Maclnnes, one of our Principal Inspectors of Historic Buildings is a major contributor. Scottish architect whose name is known throughout Great Britain and Adam, although Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the subject of an beyond earlier Journal, cannot now be far behind. The name of Adam is bandied around with about as much imprecision as estate agents reserve for 'Georgian'. Indeed, it has virtually entered the English language alongside such trade names as Hoover and Thermos. 'Adam-style' fireplaces, cornices, door furniture and other derivatives are now stocked in D-I-Y stores alongside the patio doors and double glazing. If the sincerest form of flattery is imitation, then Robert Adam clearly has his place in the Pantheon of household gods. If there is one it is Robert world of difference between being 'known' and being understood and properly appreciated. There are many furth of Scotland who are ignorant of Robert Adam's work north of the border. A guest from southern England in a well-known Scottish house was recently heard to express surprise that Robert Adam had been active but so far north! So much for Charlotte Square, Gosford House, Dumfries House in an easy Scottish smugness about this solecism we should consider before we indulge how much we know about Robert Adam. 'I kent his faither' is the traditional Caledonian put-down for those who have made good, but how many Scots know about William Adam and his works and the context and training he provided for his sons? The essays in the Journal are of value because they cause us to question our assumption that we 'know' Robert Adam simply because we have visited and enjoyed some of the fruits of his genius. We will all have our favourites the libraries at Meilerstain and Kenwood, the functionality of Register House, the monumental qualities of Culzean and Dalquharran and the charm of the garden folly at Auchincruive. Robert Adam is an old friend but it is all too easy to take old friends for granted. Friendships are deepened by critical re-appraisal and a sympathetic seeking for greater understanding. New knowledge needs to be gathered and analysed. We should be grateful to Ian Gow and John Lowrey for commissioning the contributions to this Journal and editing it. But there is .... No-one could say that Robert Adam is a prophet without honour in his own country. On the other hand his message should shine more brightly in the light of these stimulating and thought-provoking essays. GRAEME MUNRO Director and Chief Executive Historic Scotland

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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