Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

‘Fat Bodily Being’ Editorial

‘Fat Bodily Being’ Editorial Editorial Samantha Murray The overarching rubric for this special issue is ‘fat bodily-being’. However, rather than attempting to define (or more specifically, confine) this notion conceptually, the papers herein demonstrate the multiplicity of fat embodiment(s) and the impossibilities of containing them – conceptually, politically and materially. Fat bodily-being is not, and cannot be, a circumscribable or universalisable embodied experience, and in light of this, this special issue of Somatechnics does not seek to collapse, equalize or reduce fat lived experience to a singular mode of being. Rather, the goal here is to open out the diverse particularities, multiplicities, ambiguities and complexities of the lived experience(s) of fat embodiment as part of a project of somatechnical critical inquiry into the ways in which fatness is variously shaped, positioned, constructed and perceived. Somatechnics, rather than naming a definable field of study, describes a mode of critical inquiry that seeks to complicate what we understand as the relationship between technologies (dominantly perceived as the ‘machinic’, as ‘tools’ we apply to extend the capabilities of the body) and bodies, by foregrounding the inextricable, indivisible and mutually constitutive relation of bodies and techne. In the editorial in ´ our inaugural issue, we explained http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Somatechnics Edinburgh University Press

‘Fat Bodily Being’ Editorial

Somatechnics , Volume 2 (1): v – Mar 1, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/fat-bodily-being-editorial-iOW76cMnlM

References (1)

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2044-0138
eISSN
2044-0146
DOI
10.3366/soma.2012.0034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial Samantha Murray The overarching rubric for this special issue is ‘fat bodily-being’. However, rather than attempting to define (or more specifically, confine) this notion conceptually, the papers herein demonstrate the multiplicity of fat embodiment(s) and the impossibilities of containing them – conceptually, politically and materially. Fat bodily-being is not, and cannot be, a circumscribable or universalisable embodied experience, and in light of this, this special issue of Somatechnics does not seek to collapse, equalize or reduce fat lived experience to a singular mode of being. Rather, the goal here is to open out the diverse particularities, multiplicities, ambiguities and complexities of the lived experience(s) of fat embodiment as part of a project of somatechnical critical inquiry into the ways in which fatness is variously shaped, positioned, constructed and perceived. Somatechnics, rather than naming a definable field of study, describes a mode of critical inquiry that seeks to complicate what we understand as the relationship between technologies (dominantly perceived as the ‘machinic’, as ‘tools’ we apply to extend the capabilities of the body) and bodies, by foregrounding the inextricable, indivisible and mutually constitutive relation of bodies and techne. In the editorial in ´ our inaugural issue, we explained

Journal

SomatechnicsEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.