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Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae. Volume 11, Edited by the Reverend Dr Findlay Angus John Macdonald. T. & T. Clark, Edinburgh. 2000. Pp. ix, 507. Price 60. ISBN 0 567 08750 6

Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae. Volume 11, Edited by the Reverend Dr Findlay Angus John Macdonald. T.... Critics were to prove just as destructive as those of the Darwinians. However, as Barbara MacHaffie shows, in a fascinating and unexpected essay, there was a window of opportunity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when there were strenuous efforts to communicate the lessons of Believing Criticism to children in schools and Sunday schools. A revolution was attempted in the teaching of the Old Testament, with a self-conscious attempt to abandon "fact-lore", recitation and the drilling of children in the identification, as one commentator complained, of Huppim, Muppim and Ard, as well as the latitudes of Beersheba, Kirioth and Beth- Gamul; in its stead, there emerged a project to build a proper body of religious education on the basis of the latest developments in Biblical hermeneutics. What was the point of instilling the old orthodoxies into children, if, when they reached adulthood, they confronted for the first time an unfamiliar set of textual problems associated with the Bible, and then lapsed into a sceptical, irreligious outlook? Introducing schoolchildren to the broad findings of Biblical criticism, with an emphasis upon the spiritual and moral truth of Bible stories rather than upon their historicity, was a necessary inoculation against http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae. Volume 11, Edited by the Reverend Dr Findlay Angus John Macdonald. T. & T. Clark, Edinburgh. 2000. Pp. ix, 507. Price 60. ISBN 0 567 08750 6

Scottish Church History , Volume 31 (1): 13 – Apr 1, 2002

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2002.31.1.9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Critics were to prove just as destructive as those of the Darwinians. However, as Barbara MacHaffie shows, in a fascinating and unexpected essay, there was a window of opportunity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when there were strenuous efforts to communicate the lessons of Believing Criticism to children in schools and Sunday schools. A revolution was attempted in the teaching of the Old Testament, with a self-conscious attempt to abandon "fact-lore", recitation and the drilling of children in the identification, as one commentator complained, of Huppim, Muppim and Ard, as well as the latitudes of Beersheba, Kirioth and Beth- Gamul; in its stead, there emerged a project to build a proper body of religious education on the basis of the latest developments in Biblical hermeneutics. What was the point of instilling the old orthodoxies into children, if, when they reached adulthood, they confronted for the first time an unfamiliar set of textual problems associated with the Bible, and then lapsed into a sceptical, irreligious outlook? Introducing schoolchildren to the broad findings of Biblical criticism, with an emphasis upon the spiritual and moral truth of Bible stories rather than upon their historicity, was a necessary inoculation against

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

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